Waste-To-Energy (WTE) Takes Me To SHED! It’s Green and Reduces Our Carbon Footprint. Waste Management’s got WTE efforts

When I went to Cameron’s (my son) visit to the Wheelabrator, I never thought it would be more simple. 

The Wheelabrator story I talked about before but I also talked about landfill-to-gas technology.  Use see if they can take that energy too!!

WM’s VP of communications, and Wheelabrator’s Melissa Lohnes and I know have talked about my visit to the facility in Peekskill.  They enjoyed my post about waste-to-energy (WTE).  They even said thank you for taking the time to explore this topic and shed light on WM’s WTE efforts. 

Here’s where it get’s interesting:

In your post, I saw that you referenced landfill-gas-to-energy (LFGTE) as you were discussing how WTE reduces greenhouse gas emissions. That said, I wanted to follow up with you to share a bit more info on what WM is currently doing with regard to LFGTE, what this process entails, and how it impacts the surrounding environment.

WM operates 110 LFGTE plants, and uses the methane it collects to generate electricity for local communities. In fact, WM’s facilities generate enough to power 400,000 homes every day, offsetting almost two million tons of coal per year. Here’s an overview of the process, if you’re looking for more info. Also, if you’re interested, here’s an example of how LFGTE powers the University of New Hampshire.

Also, these landfills power more than just the surrounding communities. WM also converts this methane into liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG), in order to fuel its truck fleets.  For example, WM’s Altamont Landfill’s LNG produces 98% fewer emissions than diesel fuel, making LNG the lowest carbon fuel available. Together, WM’s full range of renewable energy technologies enables it to currently produce two to three times more energy than the entire solar industry

WM is committed to ensuring that its 300+ landfill sites are carefully engineered to be protective of their surrounding environments. WM follows the EPA’s landfill safety guidelines to guarantee the health of neighboring forests, streams and communities, and to ensure the safe, secure and environmentally-friendly collection and disposal of waste.

One last piece to share: in addition to using landfills as a local renewable energy resource, WM’s landfills are beneficially reused as wildlife habitats and recreational areas for the local neighborhoods.  These protected areas provide homes and breeding grounds for birds, fish, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and plant species, many of them protected or endangered. Just thought this may be of interest to you, to show the bigger picture of WM’s landfills and the purposes they serve. 

BAM!!!  WE CAN DO THIS!! WE CAN MAKE A GREEN ECONOMY RIGHT NOW!  THIS IS THAT GREEN ECONOMY.  RIGHT THERE WITH WASTE MANAGEMENT!! 

THEY ARE RIGHT NEXT TO INDIAN POINT NUCLEAR POWER PLANT!  THEY USE TO SAY WE DID NOT HAVE THE REPLACEMENT POWER NEARBY.  YES WE DO! 

STOP KIDDING OURSELVES AND PUT SOME PEOPLE BACK TO WORK!!

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