a conversation with Darrell Smith, Executive Director of the IWFA (International Window Film Association).

Recently I had the ability to connect with Darrell Smith, Executive Director of the IWFA (International Window Film Association). I have heard a lot of buzz about the topic of window film and wanted to really hear it from the source.

Here is our conversation:

1. Tell me a little about what you do at the IWFA?

A. We are a nonprofit industry trade association representing manufacturers, distributors, and dealers of window film products worldwide. We work with our members to help educate consumers, business organizations and elected officials on the wide variety of benefits that today’s window films can deliver.

Window film has come a long way in recent years – and the IWFA wants to help consumers understand this product, so they can make intelligent informed decisions about energy savings and other issues related to their home.

2. How does window film help with my curtains?

A. Window film blocks up to 99 percent of UV rays from penetrating windows, while letting visible light in. It’s the UV rays that can fade materials, cause skin damage and create hot spots around the home.

3. Is window film eligible for energy tax credits?

A. For homeowners many window films are rated to qualify, as they are considered in the same category that insulation is. Home owners should act quickly though – the $500 tax credit that window films qualify for is set to expire at the end of December 2011.

4. I’ve heard window manufacturers will void their warranty if you place window film on an insulated pane, is that true?

A. Today’s window film is so advanced it often will have a longer life-span than the windows themselves – so it will actually extend the life of your windows. Many window film manufacturers also give you a window warranty that replaces the warranty that came with the windows and is even better than the original warranty.

Hopefully this conversation will help you to figure out if window film is a better alternative to brand new windows.