How GE Connects the Dots to Bring EVs to Market

Sources: ET List, Remy C and GE Reports

While connecting the dots toward electrification for the masses, I was brought to this blog post by GE Reports on November 11, 2010.  It was in recognition and celebration of the fact that they GE is buying 25,000 electric vehicles for its fleet and fleet customers.  GE is really going all in on EV technology. They recognize that we need to integrate electric cars into our DAILY life.

While GE’s home and public WattStation EV chargers have been getting the lion’s share of attention, GE’s technology is interconnected all along the EV infrastructure chain — from generating clean electricity to leading the smart grid transformation to increasing efficiency and reliability. The info-graphic below gives a high-level overview of how the whole system works — and what part GE plays.

The so-called EV transformation — from both the utility side and the consumer side — will not only drive further clean-tech innovation, it will create jobs all along the EV supply chain. GE’s energy and tech teams see their involvement in the process as significant growth opportunity that’s expected to lead to up to $500 million in near-term business for GE.  

The EV supply chain will also create jobs in other industries. For example, Michigan is already home to 16 advanced battery manufacturers and Governor Granholm has predicted that they will produce over 60,000 jobs in the next decade.

And while today’s news revolves around the business case for EV adoption, the positive environmental impact shouldn’t get lost in the shuffle. As you can see in the info-graphic below, switching to electric cars, or hybrids, can make a serious dent in our overall emissions.General Electric EV charging station

Cleaner air:  Data: AAA’s 2010 and 2009 reports.

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