Diesel Drinking Water

In 2011, the natural gas industry was caught red-handed, secretly pumping over 32 million gallons of diesel fuel and diesel fuel by-products into the ground — and threatening our drinking water.1 This is after the industry denied using diesel in their fracking fluids!

In response, EPA has proposed draft regulations for the use of diesel in fracking. However, we need EPA to take it a step further and ban the use of diesel fuel and diesel by-products in fracking fluids. Will you help us get 25,000 letters to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson by May 31st to show widespread support for a ban on diesel?

Send a message today — tell EPA Administrator Jackson to protect our communities by banning diesel fuel and diesel fuel by-products in fracking.

The use of diesel in fracking fluids poses a great threat to our drinking water.2 Containing known carcinogens like benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylenes3, ingesting diesel can damage your central nervous system, liver and kidneys.4

The gas industry sees fracking as a profit bonanza — no matter the cost to our health or our environment. The natural gas industry can’t be trusted, and EPA needs to ban the use of diesel fuel and diesel fuel by-products in fracking.

P.S. Be sure to share this message with your friends and family. The EPA needs to hear from everyone who cares about safe drinking water.


1.”Waxman, Markey, and DeGette Investigation Finds Continued Use of Diesel in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids”, Committee on Energy and Commerce, 1/31/2011.
2. “Evaluation of Impacts to Underground Sources of Drinking Water by Hydraulic Fracturing of Coalbed Methane Reservoirs” U.S. EPA, June 2004.
3. “Public Health Statement for Benzene”, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, August 2007.
4. Basic Information about Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes in Drinking Water, U.S. EPA website.

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