New Street Light Fixtures Standards are a Good Step Forward, But Could Have Saved More


New national standards for metal halide light fixtures announced by the Department of Energy (DOE) today take another important step toward curbing energy waste and will save businesses and towns money on their utility bills. The new standards also mark progress toward meeting President Obama’s ambitious goal of saving 3 billion metric tons of CO2 from new appliance standards, as laid out in the Climate Action Plan. But stronger standards could have saved even more.

The federal standard being loose though is a step in the right direction. The best part is the numbers don’t lie on LED street lamps energy savings. Towns, villages, counties and the Federal Government know that LED is inevitable. The question is whether it will happen immediately or not. Time will tell but my guess is local government will get smart and save.

According to ACEEE: First the good news. Metal halide light fixtures are most commonly used for street and other outdoor lighting, and in high-ceilinged commercial buildings like big-box stores, warehouses and gyms. According to DOE, products meeting the new standards sold over thirty years will save light fixture buyers more than $1.1 billion dollars and reduce electricity use by 46 to 58 billion kWh. That’s enough power to meet the total needs of 4 to 5 million typical US households for one year…

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