Oceans. The Threats to our Sea and What Can Be Done to turn the Tide

Thank you so much to National Geographic for sending me the book called: Oceans. The Threats to our Sea and What Can Be Done to turn the Tide. #oceans #protectouroceans

This unique tie-in to the major motion picture Oceans—coming this April from Disney & National Geographic—explores the health of our oceans, and what we can do to improve it.

More than 75 percent of the globe is covered by the oceans. It is sometimes difficult to understand why it is called Planet Earth rather than Planet Ocean. Since half the world’s human population lives within a stone’s throw of an ocean coastline, the oceans’ health is increasingly important. Rich with resources and potential—as a source of renewable energy, new drugs, drinking water—for years we have treated them as both infinite and undamageable. But they are not.

Over-fishing, climate change, pollution, acidification, and more have put the world’s oceans and marine life at great risk.

Oceans gathers some of the most insightful visionaries, explorers, and ocean lovers— marine biologists, politicians, environmentalists, fishermen, sportsmen, deep divers, and more—in a unique anthology, in which each speaks to a unique aspect of our world’s most dimly understood dimension.

So in this companion to the Disney movie Oceans, released in April 2010. The editor candidly writes that jolting readers into environmental activism is his purpose. Credible for this task due to his stature as a documentary film producer and author (Birthplace of the Winds, 2001),

Bowermaster enlisted dozens of contributors who, in several pages apiece, address particular environmental problems of the oceans. Equal in their advocacy of urgency, they are quite unequal in expository quality.

Renowned for his works on marine biology, writer Richard Ellis observes the plight of bluefin tuna with his usual cogency and depth; alas, actor Leonardo DiCaprio’s superficial save-the-planet thoughts barely buoy a sentence, let alone a paragraph.

Between their extremes of compositional ability range most of Bowermaster’s recruits. Some are professional oceanographers; others are nonscientific activists who express their advocacy in avocations for rowing, sailing, swimming, or fishing; one battler accosts Japanese whalers on the high seas; and one advances the blue agenda as administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Bowermaster concludes with contact information to environmental organizations for motivated readers. –Gilbert Taylor

About the Author

Jon Bowermaster is a filmmaker and the author of ten books. A six-time grantee of the National Geographic Expeditions Council, his 2007-2008 Antarctic expedition was the final in his OCEANS 8 project. Also finally which over the past decade has taken him and his teams around the world by sea kayak.

When not on the sea, Bowermaster lives in Stone Ridge, New York.

Source: Jon Bowermaster and Amazon