Arçelik to reduce energy use in production by 45% in line with its “2020 Sustainability Goals”

ReportAlert 

Leading global home appliances company Arçelik A.Ş. has published its 9th sustainability report disclosing 2020 sustainability goals.  

Company comes forward with an exceptional track record and ambitious sustainability roadmap:  Having halved the production-related greenhouse gas emissions since 2010, Arçelik focuses to reduce its emissions relentlessly and signed the Science Based Targets Initiative. Leading global home appliances company Arçelik A.Ş. has published its 9th sustainability report disclosing 2020 sustainability goals.

Hakan Bulgurlu, CEO of Arçelik A.Ş. stated: “For the future of our world, we build our business plans on sustainable models. For the first time with this report, we share our goals for 2020, which are aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. We aim to reduce our energy use in production by 45% per product and to obtain the energy we use in our factories in Turkey solely from renewables by 2020.”

Company comes forward with an exceptional track record and ambitious sustainability roadmap:

Having halved the production-related greenhouse gas emissions since 2010, Arçelik focuses to reduce its emissions relentlessly and signed the Science Based Targets Initiative. 

Company reduced its energy used in production by 34% per product compared to 2010 and the goal is 45%,

achieved water savings of 31% in production per product base year 2012, and plans to increase to 35%,

increased the share of electricity obtained from renewable energy sources in its Turkey plants from 88% up to 100%,  

plans to have the 6 MWp of renewable energy capacity,  

aims to increase the percentage of the female managers from 16% up to 24%,

having adopted responsible production and consumption approach, aims to raise awareness for food waste.

plans to create a “Supplier Sustainability Index”.

To read the report 

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How to Select a Green Lodge when Traveling, Part 2

How about ecotourism associations? Don’t they have member directories that anyone can see? Of course they do, though not all are open to views from non-members. But this is one way to do your search.

For example the United Nations World Travel Organization (UNWTO) has an affiliate directory, you can narrow your search by country.

http://affiliatemembers.unwto.org/affiliate-members-directory

Some government agencies (through their tourism bureaus) and NGOs also list places that they have certified based on their training and credentialing programs. Two examples would be:

The Rainforest Alliance – http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/faqs/what-does-rainforest-alliance-certified-mean

The EU EcoLabel – http://ec.europa.eu/ecat/hotels-campsites/en

In the UK there are many opportunities for “green” and “organic” vacations.In the UK there are many opportunities for “green” and “organic” vacations. Click here to learn more about a useful directory created by a local writer from Yorkshire -  https://www.ecotourlinq.com/blog/spotlight-interview-with-organic-holidays-uk

In the UK there are many opportunities for “green” and “organic” vacations. Click here to learn more about a useful directory created by a local writer from Yorkshire –

https://www.ecotourlinq.com/blog/spotlight-interview-with-organic-holidays-uk

Here are some national ecotourism organizations with listings of green facilities in their own countries:

For the UK http://www.green-tourism.com/go-green/

For Portugal http://greenstays.pt/shop/?lang=en

For Australia (by state) – https://www.ecotourism.org.au/eco-experiences/green-travel-guide/?sStates=QLD&sCertificationDetailPages=&sExperienceTypes=15&sSearchKey=#mapContents

For Kenya – http://www.ecotourismkenya.org/facility.php

Coming up in Part 3 – What to Look for in a Green Lodge

Guest Writer Bio: Deborah Regen is the publisher of a website directory and blog dedicated to consumer information about ecotourism and sustainable travel. She also sends out a free monthly e-newsletter to subscribers including notices of giveaways. Site URL = https://www.EcoTourLinQ.com and her email = admin@ecotourlinq.com

Solar Toolkit Developed to Help Municipalities Advance Solar Projects 

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has developed a Solar PILOT Toolkit to assist the state’s municipalities in understanding and negotiating payment-in-lieu-of taxes (PILOT) agreements for solar projects larger than 1 MW, including community solar projects. Based on feedback from local government officials and solar industry representatives, NYSERDA developed the toolkit in response to the need for greater information on PILOT agreements as solar projects develop throughout the state.  The Solar PILOT Toolkit provides a framework for local taxing jurisdictions to negotiate payment agreements with solar developers. In addition to their
The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has developed a Solar PILOT Toolkit to assist the state’s municipalities in understanding and negotiating payment-in-lieu-of taxes (PILOT) agreements for solar projects larger than 1 MW, including community solar projects. Based on feedback from local government officials and solar industry representatives, NYSERDA developed the toolkit in response to the need for greater information on PILOT agreements as solar projects develop throughout the state. 
The Solar PILOT Toolkit provides a framework for local taxing jurisdictions to negotiate payment agreements with solar developers. In addition to their clean energy and job-creation benefits, solar developments can yield significant financial value to municipalities through PILOT agreement payments. The toolkit addresses the lack of information on property tax issues around solar development and is designed to enable municipalities to work with developers to negotiate PILOT rates that benefit the community and make the projects financially attractive to developers and their customers. 

“The Solar PILOT Toolkit will serve as a vital resource to help municipalities encourage the development of community solar projects and make sure they benefit the entire community,” Alicia Barton, President and CEO, NYSERDA said. “Large-scale solar projects provide a great opportunity for communities across the state to take advantage of clean, renewable energy while advancing Governor Cuomo’s Reforming the Energy Vision strategy.” 

New York State is undertaking significant changes in the way it generates and delivers electricity. As one example, community solar projects allow electric customers who are not able to install solar panels on their properties to own or subscribe to a portion of a community solar project, and benefit from the cost savings of clean generation.

As a method to promote the installation of clean energy, Section 487 of the Real Property Tax Law exempts the added assessment value of renewable energy projects, including solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, from local property taxes for 15 years. The law allows any taxing jurisdiction to “opt-out” of the tax exemption, which would then makes the PV system fully taxable.    

The Toolkit offers guidance to counties, towns and school districts on the structure of a PILOT agreement as an alternative solution for community solar participants and developers in municipalities that opt-out of the tax exemption. It also includes templates for a single jurisdiction or multiple jurisdictions that municipalities can tailor to meet their needs in working with developers to negotiate an agreement.

The Toolkit is comprised of three elements: a model resolution to guide municipalities in exercising their legal authority to adopt a PILOT; a sample agreement that jurisdictions may use to draft an agreement with developers; and a PILOT Calculator with two options that offer guidance on methods to collect revenue.

For additional information and guidance about adopting solar in local communities, local officials can contact the NY-Sun team at its contact page to identify opportunities, mitigate barriers, and learn about training, education and technical assistance opportunities. The toolkit can be found on the NYSERDA website.

NYSERDA will hold a webinar for local government officials and tax assessors to discuss the Toolkit on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 at 2 p.m. To register, visit the PILOT Toolkit website or send an email to solarhelp@nyserda.ny.gov.

About Reforming the Energy Vision

Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) is Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s strategy to lead on climate change and grow New York’s economy. REV is building a cleaner, more resilient and affordable energy system for all New Yorkers by stimulating investment in clean technologies like solar, wind, and energy efficiency and requiring 50 percent of the state’s electricity needs be generated from renewable energy by 2030. Already, REV has driven a nearly 800 percent growth in the statewide solar market, enabled over 105,000 low-income households to permanently cut their energy bills with energy efficiency, and created thousands of jobs in manufacturing, engineering, installation and other clean-tech sectors. REV is ensuring New York State reduces statewide greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent by 2030 and achieves the internationally-recognized target of reducing emissions 80 percent by 2050. To learn more about REV, including the Governor’s $5 billion investment in clean energy technology and innovation, please visit http://www.ny.gov/REV4NY and follow us at @Rev4NY.

Renewables on the grid: Putting the negative-price myth to bed

Three years ago, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) rebutted arguments that occurrences of negative prices at nuclear plants in Illinois were frequently caused by wind energy. That “compelling” data led FERC Commissioner John Norris, who had previously discussed his concerns about negative prices, to affirm that “the focus on negative prices is a distraction.”
More recently, we have documented that many instances of negative prices are caused by conventional power plants.

AWEA has now made our prior analysis far more comprehensive by examining full-year 2016 price data for all retiring power plants in the main wholesale electricity markets that have a large amount of wind generation: PJM, MISO, SPP, and ERCOT.

AWEA has now made our prior analysis far more comprehensive by examining full-year 2016 price data for all retiring power plants in the main wholesale electricity markets that have a large amount of wind generation: PJM, MISO, SPP, and ERCOT.
The results, which we are releasing today for the first time, confirm that any instances of renewable policies like the Production Tax Credit (PTC) and state renewable standard credits being factored into market prices have a trivial impact on retiring power plants.

Across more than 1.8 million data points, which cover all 2016 pricing intervals in the day-ahead electricity market for all retiring power plants in those regions, only 55 instances of negative prices were found that could have been set by a wind project receiving the PTC. The analysis includes market price data for all power plants that have retired since 2012 or have announced plans to retire.

Our analysis focused on the day-ahead electricity market (the results bolded below), as that is where nuclear and coal generators sell most if not all of their generation. However, the results show that wind plants almost never set prices for an additional 2.4 million data points in the real-time electricity market as well. For more background on electricity markets and how prices are set, see the last section of this post.

In PJM and MISO, which account for a large share of all power plants in wholesale markets that are retiring nationwide, only 0.003 percent of day-ahead market prices at retiring power plants were in a range that could be set by a wind project receiving the PTC, as shown on the left side of the table. Occurrences of negative prices that could be wind-related were even less frequent in SPP, at 0.0017 percent of day-ahead market price intervals. Those occurrences were slightly more common at retiring plants in ERCOT, at 0.06 percent of price intervals, but it should be noted that there is only one retiring coal power plant in ERCOT.

To underscore the trivial impact of the PTC in setting market prices, the right side of the table shows how prices would change if wind projects receiving the PTC no longer received the credit. In PJM and MISO, conservatively assuming that all negative prices in that range were set by wind projects receiving the PTC, Day-Ahead Market prices at retiring power plants would increase by an average of $0.0007, or 1/13th of a penny per megawatt hour (MWh), if operating wind projects no longer received the PTC. Retiring power plants in SPP saw an even smaller impact at 1/25th of a penny, while the one retiring coal power plant in ERCOT saw an impact of around one penny per MWh.

It is important to clarify that the PTC does directly reduce consumer electricity costs outside of the electricity market. The PTC and other incentives allow wind projects to offer lower long-term contract prices to customers and the utilities who serve them, which translates into lower electric bills for consumers on a 1:1 basis.

However, those contract payments are outside of the wholesale electricity market, so they are not directly factored into the wholesale electricity market prices received by other generators.

The facts about energy incentives

In reality, the wind PTC has been a remarkable success in driving the American innovation and efficiency that have driven a two-third reduction in the cost of wind energy since 2009. The more than 102,500 Americans working in the wind industry today are creating a new industry with a bright future, bringing tens of billions of dollars in investment to rural areas and tens of thousands of manufacturing jobs to America. Production-based incentives like the PTC have driven efficiency increases that make U.S. wind projects some of the most productive in the world.

In reality, the wind PTC has been a remarkable success in driving the American innovation and efficiency that have driven a two-third reduction in the cost of wind energy since 2009. The more than 102,500 Americans working in the wind industry today are creating a new industry with a bright future, bringing tens of billions of dollars in investment to rural areas and tens of thousands of manufacturing jobs to America. Production-based incentives like the PTC have driven efficiency increases that make U.S. wind projects some of the most productive in the world.    Regardless, Congress voted in December 2015 to phase down the wind PTC, and we are now in year three of that five-year phasedown period. Despite the recent focus on incentives for renewables, cumulatively wind energy has received only 3 percent of federal energy incentives, versus 86 percent for fossil and nuclear sources, according to the Nuclear Energy Institute and other experts. Given that the wind industry’s “tax reform” is already in place with the PTC phasedown legislation, we would welcome a comprehensive look at all forms of subsidies for all electricity sources.  Market dynamics are driving retirements  Market dynamics are benefiting consumers by driving retirement of older, less efficient resources in favor of more efficient resources. A wide range of experts agree that the primary factors driving power plant retirements and economic challenges for generators of all types are cheap natural gas and flat electricity demand.  The following map, compiled from Department of Energy data, shows that most retiring coal and nuclear plants are in regions that have little to no renewable generation, confirming that renewable energy or pro-renewable policies cannot be the primary factor driving those retirements.    Rather, the primary factor driving power plant retirements appears to be low-cost shale gas production undercutting relatively high-cost Appalachian and Illinois Basin coal in the Eastern U.S., as shown below. In the regions shaded red in the map, the fuel cost of producing electricity from natural gas is significantly
Regardless, Congress voted in December 2015 to phase down the wind PTC, and we are now in year three of that five-year phasedown period. Despite the recent focus on incentives for renewables, cumulatively wind energy has received only 3 percent of federal energy incentives, versus 86 percent for fossil and nuclear sources, according to the Nuclear Energy Institute and other experts. Given that the wind industry’s “tax reform” is already in place with the PTC phasedown legislation, we would welcome a comprehensive look at all forms of subsidies for all electricity sources.

Market dynamics are driving retirements

Market dynamics are benefiting consumers by driving retirement of older, less efficient resources in favor of more efficient resources. A wide range of experts agree that the primary factors driving power plant retirements and economic challenges for generators of all types are cheap natural gas and flat electricity demand.

The following map, compiled from Department of Energy data, shows that most retiring coal and nuclear plants are in regions that have little to no renewable generation, confirming that renewable energy or pro-renewable policies cannot be the primary factor driving those retirements.

Rather, the primary factor driving power plant retirements appears to be low-cost shale gas production undercutting relatively high-cost Appalachian and Illinois Basin coal in the Eastern U.S., as shown below. In the regions shaded red in the map, the fuel cost of producing electricity from natural gas is significantly lower than the fuel cost of coal power plants, explaining why utilities in those regions are moving from coal to natural gas generation.

For the entire story on the AWEA blog, MICHAEL GOGGIN, JULY 18, 2017

U.S. Data Centers Lead the Charge in Global Sustainability

Trump may have pulled the U.S. out of the Paris Accords, but sustainability and ethical responsibility in the face of climate change are urgent topics U.S. enterprises – especially those doing business in the EU – must address and understand. This constant conversation is the new reality:

It’s not going away.

Interxion (NYSE: INXN) has long positioned itself as an expert in helping U.S.-based Fortune 50 companies expand their footprints into the EU, Middle East, Africa and beyond, by providing digital and physical co-location infrastructure (e.g., data centers, vast networks of submarine cables), and especially, critical experience navigating sustainability best practices and regulations.  

Bob Landstrom, Interxion’s Director of Product Management, is offering his thoughts on U.S. data centers and how they’re leading the charge in global sustainability. Bob’s insights would be an excellent addition to a sustainability-related piece. 

In particular, US data center operators do not seem to be lining up to abandon climate change initiatives. Data centers are among the largest industrial consumers of energy in the US and abroad, and operational costs are driven by energy consumption - so good stewardship of energy use is good for business. US data centers may sometimes be driven by a corporate commitment to sustainable or green practices, but more often the motivation for going green is financial. They’ve discovered that many energy efficiency actions demonstrate reasonably short payback periods with a clear path to energy cost savings. The contribution of sustainably sourcedIt’s not going away.  Interxion (NYSE: INXN) has long positioned itself as an expert in helping U.S.-based Fortune 50 companies expand their footprints into the EU, Middle East, Africa and beyond, by providing digital and physical co-location infrastructure (e.g., data centers, vast networks of submarine cables), and especially, critical experience navigating sustainability best practices and regulations.    Bob Landstrom, Interxion’s Director of Product Management, is offering his thoughts on U.S. data centers and how they’re leading the charge in global sustainability. Bob’s insights would be an excellent addition to a sustainability-related piece.   In particular, US data center operators do not seem to be lining up to abandon climate change initiatives. Data centers are among the largest industrial consumers of energy in the US and abroad, and operational costs are driven by energy consumption - so good stewardship of energy use is good for business. US data centers may sometimes be driven by a corporate commitment to sustainable or green practices, but more often the motivation for going green is financial. They’ve discovered that many energy efficiency actions demonstrate reasonably short payback periods with a clear path to energy cost savings. The contribution of sustainably sourced

“While President Trump has pulled the US out of the Paris Agreement there is evidence that other entities in the US do not share the same sentiment.

In particular, US data center operators do not seem to be lining up to abandon climate change initiatives. Data centers are among the largest industrial consumers of energy in the US and abroad, and operational costs are driven by energy consumption – so good stewardship of energy use is good for business. US data centers may sometimes be driven by a corporate commitment to sustainable or green practices, but more often the motivation for going green is financial. They’ve discovered that many energy efficiency actions demonstrate reasonably short payback periods with a clear path to energy cost savings. The contribution of sustainably sourced energy to the grid, such as from wind and solar continues to increase. These technologies continue to demonstrate efficiency gains. An abundance of cost savings and carbon reduction opportunities are on the table and energy efficiency improvement will continue to be a goal, unaffected by the Paris Agreement withdrawal. US data centers are seldom under regulatory pressures to “green-up,” but they clearly recognize that a reduced PUE equates to reduced operational expense.  

Abroad (Europe in particular) there are regulatory pressures to ensure data centers practice responsible energy management, and this is driving investment in green practices that are ultimately good for companies’ bottom lines. Forward thinking US data center managers know that investment in green technology and improved energy efficiency is necessary to keep pace with the global community. Businesses looking to expand abroad will find that an IT operations strategy built on sustainable practices will make the transition easier.”