Arçelik to reduce energy use in production by 45% in line with its “2020 Sustainability Goals”

ReportAlert 

Leading global home appliances company Arçelik A.Ş. has published its 9th sustainability report disclosing 2020 sustainability goals.  

Company comes forward with an exceptional track record and ambitious sustainability roadmap:  Having halved the production-related greenhouse gas emissions since 2010, Arçelik focuses to reduce its emissions relentlessly and signed the Science Based Targets Initiative. Leading global home appliances company Arçelik A.Ş. has published its 9th sustainability report disclosing 2020 sustainability goals.

Hakan Bulgurlu, CEO of Arçelik A.Ş. stated: “For the future of our world, we build our business plans on sustainable models. For the first time with this report, we share our goals for 2020, which are aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. We aim to reduce our energy use in production by 45% per product and to obtain the energy we use in our factories in Turkey solely from renewables by 2020.”

Company comes forward with an exceptional track record and ambitious sustainability roadmap:

Having halved the production-related greenhouse gas emissions since 2010, Arçelik focuses to reduce its emissions relentlessly and signed the Science Based Targets Initiative. 

Company reduced its energy used in production by 34% per product compared to 2010 and the goal is 45%,

achieved water savings of 31% in production per product base year 2012, and plans to increase to 35%,

increased the share of electricity obtained from renewable energy sources in its Turkey plants from 88% up to 100%,  

plans to have the 6 MWp of renewable energy capacity,  

aims to increase the percentage of the female managers from 16% up to 24%,

having adopted responsible production and consumption approach, aims to raise awareness for food waste.

plans to create a “Supplier Sustainability Index”.

To read the report 

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Renewables on the grid: Putting the negative-price myth to bed

Three years ago, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) rebutted arguments that occurrences of negative prices at nuclear plants in Illinois were frequently caused by wind energy. That “compelling” data led FERC Commissioner John Norris, who had previously discussed his concerns about negative prices, to affirm that “the focus on negative prices is a distraction.”
More recently, we have documented that many instances of negative prices are caused by conventional power plants.

AWEA has now made our prior analysis far more comprehensive by examining full-year 2016 price data for all retiring power plants in the main wholesale electricity markets that have a large amount of wind generation: PJM, MISO, SPP, and ERCOT.

AWEA has now made our prior analysis far more comprehensive by examining full-year 2016 price data for all retiring power plants in the main wholesale electricity markets that have a large amount of wind generation: PJM, MISO, SPP, and ERCOT.
The results, which we are releasing today for the first time, confirm that any instances of renewable policies like the Production Tax Credit (PTC) and state renewable standard credits being factored into market prices have a trivial impact on retiring power plants.

Across more than 1.8 million data points, which cover all 2016 pricing intervals in the day-ahead electricity market for all retiring power plants in those regions, only 55 instances of negative prices were found that could have been set by a wind project receiving the PTC. The analysis includes market price data for all power plants that have retired since 2012 or have announced plans to retire.

Our analysis focused on the day-ahead electricity market (the results bolded below), as that is where nuclear and coal generators sell most if not all of their generation. However, the results show that wind plants almost never set prices for an additional 2.4 million data points in the real-time electricity market as well. For more background on electricity markets and how prices are set, see the last section of this post.

In PJM and MISO, which account for a large share of all power plants in wholesale markets that are retiring nationwide, only 0.003 percent of day-ahead market prices at retiring power plants were in a range that could be set by a wind project receiving the PTC, as shown on the left side of the table. Occurrences of negative prices that could be wind-related were even less frequent in SPP, at 0.0017 percent of day-ahead market price intervals. Those occurrences were slightly more common at retiring plants in ERCOT, at 0.06 percent of price intervals, but it should be noted that there is only one retiring coal power plant in ERCOT.

To underscore the trivial impact of the PTC in setting market prices, the right side of the table shows how prices would change if wind projects receiving the PTC no longer received the credit. In PJM and MISO, conservatively assuming that all negative prices in that range were set by wind projects receiving the PTC, Day-Ahead Market prices at retiring power plants would increase by an average of $0.0007, or 1/13th of a penny per megawatt hour (MWh), if operating wind projects no longer received the PTC. Retiring power plants in SPP saw an even smaller impact at 1/25th of a penny, while the one retiring coal power plant in ERCOT saw an impact of around one penny per MWh.

It is important to clarify that the PTC does directly reduce consumer electricity costs outside of the electricity market. The PTC and other incentives allow wind projects to offer lower long-term contract prices to customers and the utilities who serve them, which translates into lower electric bills for consumers on a 1:1 basis.

However, those contract payments are outside of the wholesale electricity market, so they are not directly factored into the wholesale electricity market prices received by other generators.

The facts about energy incentives

In reality, the wind PTC has been a remarkable success in driving the American innovation and efficiency that have driven a two-third reduction in the cost of wind energy since 2009. The more than 102,500 Americans working in the wind industry today are creating a new industry with a bright future, bringing tens of billions of dollars in investment to rural areas and tens of thousands of manufacturing jobs to America. Production-based incentives like the PTC have driven efficiency increases that make U.S. wind projects some of the most productive in the world.

In reality, the wind PTC has been a remarkable success in driving the American innovation and efficiency that have driven a two-third reduction in the cost of wind energy since 2009. The more than 102,500 Americans working in the wind industry today are creating a new industry with a bright future, bringing tens of billions of dollars in investment to rural areas and tens of thousands of manufacturing jobs to America. Production-based incentives like the PTC have driven efficiency increases that make U.S. wind projects some of the most productive in the world.    Regardless, Congress voted in December 2015 to phase down the wind PTC, and we are now in year three of that five-year phasedown period. Despite the recent focus on incentives for renewables, cumulatively wind energy has received only 3 percent of federal energy incentives, versus 86 percent for fossil and nuclear sources, according to the Nuclear Energy Institute and other experts. Given that the wind industry’s “tax reform” is already in place with the PTC phasedown legislation, we would welcome a comprehensive look at all forms of subsidies for all electricity sources.  Market dynamics are driving retirements  Market dynamics are benefiting consumers by driving retirement of older, less efficient resources in favor of more efficient resources. A wide range of experts agree that the primary factors driving power plant retirements and economic challenges for generators of all types are cheap natural gas and flat electricity demand.  The following map, compiled from Department of Energy data, shows that most retiring coal and nuclear plants are in regions that have little to no renewable generation, confirming that renewable energy or pro-renewable policies cannot be the primary factor driving those retirements.    Rather, the primary factor driving power plant retirements appears to be low-cost shale gas production undercutting relatively high-cost Appalachian and Illinois Basin coal in the Eastern U.S., as shown below. In the regions shaded red in the map, the fuel cost of producing electricity from natural gas is significantly
Regardless, Congress voted in December 2015 to phase down the wind PTC, and we are now in year three of that five-year phasedown period. Despite the recent focus on incentives for renewables, cumulatively wind energy has received only 3 percent of federal energy incentives, versus 86 percent for fossil and nuclear sources, according to the Nuclear Energy Institute and other experts. Given that the wind industry’s “tax reform” is already in place with the PTC phasedown legislation, we would welcome a comprehensive look at all forms of subsidies for all electricity sources.

Market dynamics are driving retirements

Market dynamics are benefiting consumers by driving retirement of older, less efficient resources in favor of more efficient resources. A wide range of experts agree that the primary factors driving power plant retirements and economic challenges for generators of all types are cheap natural gas and flat electricity demand.

The following map, compiled from Department of Energy data, shows that most retiring coal and nuclear plants are in regions that have little to no renewable generation, confirming that renewable energy or pro-renewable policies cannot be the primary factor driving those retirements.

Rather, the primary factor driving power plant retirements appears to be low-cost shale gas production undercutting relatively high-cost Appalachian and Illinois Basin coal in the Eastern U.S., as shown below. In the regions shaded red in the map, the fuel cost of producing electricity from natural gas is significantly lower than the fuel cost of coal power plants, explaining why utilities in those regions are moving from coal to natural gas generation.

For the entire story on the AWEA blog, MICHAEL GOGGIN, JULY 18, 2017

Experts Share their Secrets to an Eco Friendly Lifestyle

Whether it’s protesting the US withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement or vowing to transition to electric-only vehicles within the next decade, many businesses have been focusing on how they can do their part in saving our planet.

Although many Americans want to make the personal transition towards green living themselves, most don’t even know where to begin! That’s why the team at EmPower Solar decided to speak with a panel of eco-friendly experts on their personal practices. You can see their best advice here.  

Whether it’s protesting the US withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement or vowing to transition to electric-only vehicles within the next decade, many businesses have been focusing on how they can do their part in saving our planet.  Although many Americans want to make the personal transition towards green living themselves, most don’t even know where to begin! That’s why the team at EmPower Solar decided to speak with a panel of eco-friendly experts on their personal practices. You can see their best advice here.

U.S. Data Centers Lead the Charge in Global Sustainability

Trump may have pulled the U.S. out of the Paris Accords, but sustainability and ethical responsibility in the face of climate change are urgent topics U.S. enterprises – especially those doing business in the EU – must address and understand. This constant conversation is the new reality:

It’s not going away.

Interxion (NYSE: INXN) has long positioned itself as an expert in helping U.S.-based Fortune 50 companies expand their footprints into the EU, Middle East, Africa and beyond, by providing digital and physical co-location infrastructure (e.g., data centers, vast networks of submarine cables), and especially, critical experience navigating sustainability best practices and regulations.  

Bob Landstrom, Interxion’s Director of Product Management, is offering his thoughts on U.S. data centers and how they’re leading the charge in global sustainability. Bob’s insights would be an excellent addition to a sustainability-related piece. 

In particular, US data center operators do not seem to be lining up to abandon climate change initiatives. Data centers are among the largest industrial consumers of energy in the US and abroad, and operational costs are driven by energy consumption - so good stewardship of energy use is good for business. US data centers may sometimes be driven by a corporate commitment to sustainable or green practices, but more often the motivation for going green is financial. They’ve discovered that many energy efficiency actions demonstrate reasonably short payback periods with a clear path to energy cost savings. The contribution of sustainably sourcedIt’s not going away.  Interxion (NYSE: INXN) has long positioned itself as an expert in helping U.S.-based Fortune 50 companies expand their footprints into the EU, Middle East, Africa and beyond, by providing digital and physical co-location infrastructure (e.g., data centers, vast networks of submarine cables), and especially, critical experience navigating sustainability best practices and regulations.    Bob Landstrom, Interxion’s Director of Product Management, is offering his thoughts on U.S. data centers and how they’re leading the charge in global sustainability. Bob’s insights would be an excellent addition to a sustainability-related piece.   In particular, US data center operators do not seem to be lining up to abandon climate change initiatives. Data centers are among the largest industrial consumers of energy in the US and abroad, and operational costs are driven by energy consumption - so good stewardship of energy use is good for business. US data centers may sometimes be driven by a corporate commitment to sustainable or green practices, but more often the motivation for going green is financial. They’ve discovered that many energy efficiency actions demonstrate reasonably short payback periods with a clear path to energy cost savings. The contribution of sustainably sourced

“While President Trump has pulled the US out of the Paris Agreement there is evidence that other entities in the US do not share the same sentiment.

In particular, US data center operators do not seem to be lining up to abandon climate change initiatives. Data centers are among the largest industrial consumers of energy in the US and abroad, and operational costs are driven by energy consumption – so good stewardship of energy use is good for business. US data centers may sometimes be driven by a corporate commitment to sustainable or green practices, but more often the motivation for going green is financial. They’ve discovered that many energy efficiency actions demonstrate reasonably short payback periods with a clear path to energy cost savings. The contribution of sustainably sourced energy to the grid, such as from wind and solar continues to increase. These technologies continue to demonstrate efficiency gains. An abundance of cost savings and carbon reduction opportunities are on the table and energy efficiency improvement will continue to be a goal, unaffected by the Paris Agreement withdrawal. US data centers are seldom under regulatory pressures to “green-up,” but they clearly recognize that a reduced PUE equates to reduced operational expense.  

Abroad (Europe in particular) there are regulatory pressures to ensure data centers practice responsible energy management, and this is driving investment in green practices that are ultimately good for companies’ bottom lines. Forward thinking US data center managers know that investment in green technology and improved energy efficiency is necessary to keep pace with the global community. Businesses looking to expand abroad will find that an IT operations strategy built on sustainable practices will make the transition easier.”

Renowned Photographer Joel Sartore Travels the Globe to Create the Photo Ark

PBS' RARE: Creatures of the Photo Ark profiles renowned National Geographic photographer, author and conservationist Joel Sartore as he documents threatened species at zoos, in nature preserves and more for his long-running

PBS’ RARE: Creatures of the Photo Ark profiles renowned National Geographic photographer, author and conservationist Joel Sartore as he documents threatened species at zoos, in nature preserves and more for his long-running “Photo Ark” project. 
PBS' RARE: Creatures of the Photo Ark profiles renowned National Geographic photographer, author and conservationist Joel Sartore as he documents threatened species at zoos, in nature preserves and more for his long-running

Episode 2 – Premieres Tuesday, July 25 at 9/8C
Joel will go anywhere to add another rare species to the Photo Ark. He travels to Spain to photograph the Iberian lynx, once the rarest cat in the world. He gets a rare look inside a breeding center that teaches lynx how to hunt their main food source: rabbits. But scientists working in China might be too late in saving the Yangtze giant softshell turtle. With only three left in the world, Joel witnesses an attempt to artificially inseminate the last known female and keep this species from going extinct.

Joel will go anywhere to add another rare species to the Photo Ark. He travels to Spain to photograph the Iberian lynx, once the rarest cat in the world. He gets a rare look inside a breeding center that teaches lynx how to hunt their main food source: rabbits. But scientists working in China might be too late in saving the Yangtze giant softshell turtle. With only three left in the world, Joel witnesses an attempt to artificially inseminate the last known female and keep this species from going extinct.
Joel hates hiking, but in Cameroon, he has the opportunity to glimpse the Cross River gorilla in the wild. Little is known about the rarest great ape in the world and he gets close enough to nap in its nest. But the highlight of the trek is extracting beetles from cow dung – because every creature counts in the Photo Ark.

Press Release:

BOSTON, MA [June 28, 2017] – Renowned National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore is a natural-born storyteller. His Photo Ark project is a digital “collection” of the world’s mammals, fish, amphibians, birds, reptiles and insects, and the focus of RARE-Creatures of the Photo Ark. This captivating new three-part series, produced by WGBH Boston and premiering on PBS in Summer 2017, follows Sartore as he documents threatened species at zoos, in nature preserves, and more. Throughout RARE, scientists and naturalists reveal surprising and important information about why ensuring the future of these animals is so critical. Follow Sartore’s adventures at #RarePBS.

Author, conservationist and National Geographic Fellow, Sartore has traveled to nearly 40 countries to photograph 6,395 species for the Photo Ark to date, including 576 amphibians, 1,839 birds, 716 fish, 1,123 invertebrates, 896 mammals, and 1,245 reptiles in captivity. When complete the Photo Ark will be one of the most comprehensive records of the world’s biodiversity. Through RARE, audiences can journey with Sartore across the globe—to Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and Oceania—to chronicle his experiences
RARE-Creatures of the Photo Ark premieres on consecutive Tuesdays—on July 18, July 25 and August 1—at 9 pm ET/8c on PBS.

Author, conservationist and National Geographic Fellow, Sartore has traveled to nearly 40 countries to photograph 6,395 species for the Photo Ark to date, including 576 amphibians, 1,839 birds, 716 fish, 1,123 invertebrates, 896 mammals, and 1,245 reptiles in captivity. When complete the Photo Ark will be one of the most comprehensive records of the world’s biodiversity. Through RARE, audiences can journey with Sartore across the globe—to Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and Oceania—to chronicle his experiences. 

“Viewers will see the spectacular variety and beauty of these animals, large and small, whose lives are intertwined with ours,” said John Bredar, executive producer of RARE and VP of National Programming for WGBH. “The loss of biodiversity exacts a toll on all our lives.” 

But there are also losses: at the Dvur Kralove Zoo near Prague, in one of RARE’s most emotional moments, Sartore’s camera records a northern white rhino—a very old female and, at the time, one of only five left in the world. Now, only three remain.
In the premiere episode of RARE, prankish semi-habituated lemurs playfully crawl over Sartore at Madagascar’s Lemur Island rehab center, during one of his easiest photography shoots. Others are more challenging: as no amount of tasty, tempting raw carrots can persuade a 500-pound, 150-year-old giant tortoise to stand on his mark or get ready for his close-up. Likewise, in Florida, a photo of an elusive bunny taking refuge near an active U.S. Navy airstrip has taken four years to procure for the Photo Ark. It’s all in a day’s work….

Sartore knows he is in a race against time. Sometimes he is able to photograph 30 to 40 species in a few days. Others are disappearing before he can get to them. RARE looks at factors driving extinction, including deforestation, rising sea levels, invasive species, pollution and human development, all impacting creatures essential to the world’s ecosystems.

“RARE provides audiences the opportunity to follow in the footsteps of an exceptional photographer with an extraordinary mission. We share Joel’s goal that through his photography and these films, people will be inspired to care while there is time,” says Laurie Donnelly, executive producer of RARE and director of Lifestyle Programming at WGBH, where she has overseen series such as I’ll Have What Phil’s Having and Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler. 

In the second hour, Sartore travels around the globe in pursuit of some of the rarest and most vulnerable creatures on earth—trying to capture these species for the Photo Ark before they go extinct. In China, he goes in search of the Yangtze giant softshell turtle, with just three left on the planet, and the South China tiger, which has not been seen in the wild for more than 30 years. In Spain, he photographs one of the rarest small cats, the Iberian lynx, whose numbers fell to fewer than a hundred 15 years ago, then he heads to Africa to the mountain rainforest of Cameroon to accompany scientists working on the frontlines to save the cross river gorilla, the rarest gorilla on earth.

In RARE’s final episode, Sartore treks up a mountain in New Zealand to photograph the rowi kiwi, accompanying a naturalist to rescue its egg successfully. Without this intervention, there is only a five percent chance of survivability for this rare flightless bird. 

But there are also losses: at the Dvur Kralove Zoo near Prague, in one of RARE’s most emotional moments, Sartore’s camera records a northern white rhino—a very old female and, at the time, one of only five left in the world. Now, only three remain.

Sartore likes photographing the smallest creatures for the Photo Ark because they’re often more important to the health of an ecosystem than the big ones, like the naked mole rat: blind, buck-toothed and hairless, it is also cancer-resistant—and scientists are researching why. And he has seen how photos can lead to change. His images of parrots in South America and koalas in Australia prompted local governments to protect them. In the U.S., coverage of the Photo Ark has helped to save the Florida grasshopper sparrow and the Salt Creek tiger beetle.  “Fifty percent of all animals are threatened with extinction, and it’s folly to think we can drive half of everything else to extinction but that people will be just fine,” says Sartore. “That’s why I created what’s now called the National Geographic Photo Ark. I hope seeing the images fills people with wonder and inspires them to want to protect these species.”
Sartore likes photographing the smallest creatures for the Photo Ark because they’re often more important to the health of an ecosystem than the big ones, like the naked mole rat: blind, buck-toothed and hairless, it is also cancer-resistant—and scientists are researching why. And he has seen how photos can lead to change. His images of parrots in South America and koalas in Australia prompted local governments to protect them. In the U.S., coverage of the Photo Ark has helped to save the Florida grasshopper sparrow and the Salt Creek tiger beetle.

“Fifty percent of all animals are threatened with extinction, and it’s folly to think we can drive half of everything else to extinction but that people will be just fine,” says Sartore. “That’s why I created what’s now called the National Geographic Photo Ark. I hope seeing the images fills people with wonder and inspires them to want to protect these species.”

RARE is premiering in conjunction with an ongoing initiative by National Geographic, which is showcasing the Photo Ark project throughout 2017 on multiple platforms, including exhibitions around the world, two new books and digital features. Learn more at NatGeoPhotoArk.org.

RARE—Creatures of the Photo Ark is a production of WGBH Boston and So World Media, LLC in association with National Geographic Channels. Executive producers are John Bredar and Laurie Donnelly. Series producer/writer: Stella Cha. Producer/director: Chun-Wei Yi. RARE is made possible with funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Kendeda Fund, the Candis J. Stern Foundation and public television viewers.
RARE – Creatures of the Photo Ark is part of “PBS Summer of Adventure,” taking viewers and their families on an adventure around the world this season. The lineup of history, science and natural history programming includes the six-part series THE STORY OF CHINA, an exploration of China’s 4,000-year history featuring Michael Wood beginning June 20. The five-part program BIG PACIFIC, starting June 21, reveals the Pacific Ocean’s most guarded secrets. Following BIG PACIFIC on June 21, GREAT YELLOWSTONE THAW is a three-part series showcasing the stories of different animal families as they attempt to survive the toughest spring on Earth. On July 12, the three-part NATURE’S GREAT RACE explores the most astounding migrations on earth. WEEKEND IN HAVANA is a one-hour walking tour through Cuba on July 18. In WILD ALASKA LIVE, airing live over three nights beginning July 23, witness a must-see natural spectacle as thousands of the world’s wildest animals gather to take part in Alaska’s amazing summer feast. 

On August 2, IRELAND’S WILD COAST takes viewers on a one-hour journey along the island’s rugged Atlantic coast. Summer of Adventure will also include PBS KIDS programming, featuring three new one-hour specials: NATURE CAT: OCEAN COMMOTION (premieres June 19), WILD KRATTS ALASKA: HERO’S JOURNEY (premieres Monday, July 24.) and READY JET GO!: BACK TO BORTRON 7 (premieres August 14).

Sources: WGBH Boston  hearing or visual impairments. More info at , PBS

Previews & Scenes/Animals & Locations in episode: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/rare/episode/episode-2/

Episode 3 (series finale)- Premieres Tuesday, August 1 at 9/8c
In his 25 years as a National Geographic photographer, Joel Sartore has learned to never ignore the smaller creatures in our midst. Joel gets us up close with colorful and charismatic insects with faces and features usually found in sci-fi flicks, because “they help make the world go ‘round.” Joel also goes in search of larger animals. In the Czech Republic and in one of the series’ most poignant moments, Joel boards the rarest rhinoceros in the world onto the Photo Ark. Nabiré is one of only five of northern white rhinos left on the planet and it may be too late for her kind.

Joel’s got one more hike-he’d-rather-not-hike in him, this time in New Zealand where he tags along on a Rowi kiwi egg rescue. By taking and hatching these enormous kiwi eggs, scientists give these birds a fighting chance against unnatural predators. If they didn’t rescue the eggs, the species would go extinct.

Previews & Scenes/Animals & Locations in episode: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/rare/episode/episode-3/