Geothermal company Dandelion Energy partnering with Hudson Solar to bring 100% Renewable Energy to Hudson Valley and Capitol Region of NY

Today, my new partners at Dandelion, which is a geothermal startup that recently graduated X, the research and development lab at Google’s parent company, announces a partnership with Hudson Solar, the leading residential solarinstaller in the Hudson Valley and Capital Region.  Yes I’m teamed up with a Google Startup ok breathe breathe!).  

Plus, I know Hudson Solar. They were chosen as a leading provider of solar in the Solarize campaigns throughout most of the Hudson Valley. 

Together, these companies will offer homeowners the opportunity to easily get their homes to go 100% GREEN ENERGY. 
Dandelion as reported in the Poughkeepsie Journal today uses a new geothermal installation process developed at X, can convert homeowners away from oil or gas heat and offer them substantial savings.  

Hudson Solar, with its on-site or community solar offerings, can then offer homeowners to lower the cost of solar power.  A homeowner with geothermal, solar and energy efficiency can easily go 100 percent renewable. The Dandelion geothermal system will use solar electricity and the ground, as a source of heat and heatsink, to provide a home with heating, cooling and hot water! (BOOM!!)
Hudson Solar, with its on-site or community solar offerings, can then offer homeowners to lower the cost of solar power.  A homeowner with geothermal, solar and energy efficiency can easily go 100 percent renewable. The Dandelion geothermal system will use solar electricity and the ground, as a source of heat and heatsink, to provide a home with heating, cooling and hot water! (BOOM!!) 

Let’s put it this way, average geothermal installs cost around $40,000. Dandelion is about $20,000 and will offer financing and monthly payment plans. 

Now while solar costs about the same, the finance costs will be really more affordable than the grid.

Geothermal company Dandelion Energy partnering with Hudson Solar to bring 100% Renewable Energy to Hudson Valley and Capitol Region of NYDandelion Energy partners with Hudson Solar to bring 100% Renewable Energy to Hudson Valley and Capitol District in NY

“We chose Hudson Solar as our first solar partner because the company is well known for their high-quality work and share our values and excitement about the impact that our combined product will have on combating climate change,” Dandelion CEO Kathy Hannun said. “Hudson Solar’s unique offering of both on-site and community solar systems means they can provide all of Dandelion’s customers a way to power their geothermal systems with clean electricity. ”

“Dandelion has lowered the cost of geothermal and set up financing so a homeowner switching to geothermal from oil or propane can save money from day one, just like with solar,” Hudson Solar CEO Jeff Irish said. ” … And with our community solar arrays, even people who can’t site solar on their property can go solar.”

Source: Dandelion Energy

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Nebraskans Install First Solar Panels Inside the Keystone XL Pipeline Route

‘Solar XL’ project breaks ground along Keystone XL pipeline in Nebraska, highlighting clean energy solutions over the fossil fuel industry
 
Silver Creek, NE — On Saturday, July 29th, the “Solar XL” project placed its first solar panels along the route of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, on the farm of Nebraska landowners Jim and Chris Carlson near Silver Creek. The Carlsons, who rejected a $307,000 offer from the pipeline company TransCanada to build Keystone XL through their backyard, partnered with Bold Nebraska, 350.org, Indigenous Environmental Network, CREDO, and Oil Change International to put renewable energy directly in the pipeline’s path. Solar XL underscores the need to center solutions to climate change while rejecting the Keystone XL pipeline and resisting the expansion of the fossil fuel industry. 

“Build Our Energy Barn” built in 2013 on the Hammond family’s land inside KXL route near York, Nebraska — one of the many signs of resistance to Keystone XL. Photo Credit: Mary Anne Andrei / Bold Nebraska

Source:https://www.flickr.com/photos/boldnebraska/albums/72157686827119456

“While we are dedicated to Keep It In The Ground efforts to stop new fossil fuel development, we are also deeply committed to the Just Transition. Solar and renewable energy can provide a sustainable transition away from fossil fuels and provide job growth in areas traditionally left behind, like rural America and our Indigenous communities. By placing solar projects in the route of Keystone XL, we are demonstrating how vital it is to not just stop dangerous and unnecessary projects like KXL but to also show that there are alternatives to the fossil fuel industry that do not put communities at risk and sacrifice Indigenous Peoples and land. We are excited to be a part of this resistance that also highlights the solutions that are needed,” commented Joye Braun, organizer from the Indigenous Environmental Network.

The Solar XL project is being supported through an ongoing crowdfunding campaign launched earlier this month. The solar panels, which will be installed in at least two other locations along the pipeline route, will serve not only as a form of clean energy, but as a symbol of the urgent need for a just transition away from fossil fuels toward a 100% renewable energy economy. The panels will help power the homes of Nebraskans resisting Keystone XL, and are being installed by the family-owned rural solar business, North Star Solar Bears, run by Jim Knopik.

Jim Knopik (left) and North Star Solar Bears solar installers with farmer Rick Hammond (right) and his 25 kW solar array near Benedict, NE. (Photo: Mary Anne Andrei)
Jim Knopik (left) and North Star Solar Bears solar installers with farmer Rick Hammond (right) and his 25 kW solar array near Benedict, NE. (Photo: Mary Anne Andrei)
‘Solar XL’ project breaks ground along Keystone XL pipeline in Nebraska, highlighting clean energy solutions over the fossil fuel industryThe Keystone XL pipeline would carry 830,000 barrels of dirty tar sands oil a day from Canada through Montana, South Dakota, and Nebraska, and then on to the export market. The pipeline would pass through farms, ranches, and Indigenous land, posing a threat to the Ogallala Aquifer and other water sources that would be contaminated by spills and leaks. Landowners continue to fight eminent domain for private gain knowing this would be the first time the Public Service Commission (PSC) grants those powers to a foreign corporation. Lastly, all along the route, local economies are connected to agriculture, and climate change is a serious issue. Keystone XL would significantly add to climate risks for farmers, ranchers and Tribal Nations.

The first installation took place just over a week before the Nebraska Public Service Commission holds hearings in Lincoln on whether to grant a construction permit for Keystone XL through the state. One day before the hearings on August 6th, people from around Nebraska and surrounding states will converge for a march through the streets of Lincoln urging the Commissioners to reject the permit. If permits are granted for Keystone XL construction in Nebraska, TransCanada will have to tear down homegrown clean energy in order to build, galvanizing people across the country to fight back.
  

Jim Carlson, Nebraska landowner who placed solar in path of Keystone XL on his family’s farm: 

“I am vehemently opposed to the Keystone XL pipeline mainly because of the properties of the contents of the tar sands oil it will carry — this is not your Mother’s crude oil, it is the Devil’s, and it can kill. We must be focused on clean, renewable energy and America can get along just fine without this foul concoction they call bitumen that TransCanada wants to pipe across our precious soil and water.”
Jim Knopik, North Star Solar Bears. LLC:

“Our family-run company is based in Nebraska — and by installing solar projects, like the ones to stop the Keystone XL pipeline — my kids are able to stay on the farm. It’s time for our country to start the transition to clean energy now.”

More information on the “Solar XL” project:

http://boldnebraska.org/solarxl

Three out of three: Three titles for Renault e.dams in three seasons of FIA Formula E

Created three years ago, the FIA Formula E championship saw Renault confirm its supremacy. The performance and energy of Renault e.dams was duly rewarded, as the French squad was crowned FIA Formula E champions for a third consecutive season. They are currently the only team in the category who has won the teams’ title.

During the first two seasons, Renault e.dams embraced the challenge of the Formula E championship from the outset, by winning the teams’ title on two consecutive occasions. Sébastien Buemi missed the drivers’ crown by only one point in the first season, but fought back even stronger in the second year and was crowned champion after a thrilling season finale in London.

Three out of three: Three titles for Renault e.dams in three seasons of FIA Formula E
This year, Renault e.dams managed yet again, to win the title thanks to a stunning level of consistency with six victories out of twelve races. They are the only team to have scored points in each race. With the squad very keen to reclaim their crown, the team and Sébastien Buemi were victorious at the opening round in Hong Kong. More wins followed in Marrakech and Buenos Aires. The team soon returned to winning ways in Monaco, where the Swiss driver started from pole position – his first of the season, and he remained unchallenged on the Monegasque track. One week later in Paris, Sébastien offered his first victory on home soil to Renault e.dams. He then added another victory to his tally in the second race in Berlin – his sixth in eight races. Meanwhile, Nico Prost allowed the team to get closer to the teams’ title by scoring valuable points in each round and was the only driver to have accomplished this impressive feat.

The race for the title was very tight at the Montreal season finale as only 18 points separated Sébastien from his closest rival, Lucas di Grassi, as they approached the decisive weekend in Canada. Unfortunately, the team had a disappointing day on Saturday with Sébastien’s accident in free practice and his disqualification, while bad luck returned on Sunday with a tough race for both drivers.

To read the full article, click here from Renault Nissan Alliance 

 

Sustainability and pallets: Making change for the long haul

Roger Ballentine and Adam Pener – Thursday, June 8, 2017 

Maybe it’s time for corporate sustainability to get a bit more boring. Rightfully so, bold commitments by leading companies to 100 percent renewable energy or zero waste garner headlines. But the durability (or perhaps the sustainability) of sustainability comes from business practices that reduce environmental impacts while saving money.

Sometimes these measures are not especially sexy. Consider the lowly shipping pallet. Millions of times a day, companies receive and send goods loaded on pallets. Overwhelmingly, these pallets are made of wood and weigh about 50 pounds. 

Logisticians know that space + weight = cost; sustainability experts know that space + weight = emissions. 

What we have, therefore, is an opportunity for durable, sustainable change. Each year an estimated 10 billion loaded wood pallets are shipped just in the United States. In pallet weight alone, swapping out wood for corrugated pallets could reduce the amount of annual U.S. trucking weight by as much as 400 billion pounds, thereby reducing carbon dioxide emissions (CO2e) by millions of metric tons annually. 

As sustainability leaders such as IKEA have demonstrated, companies can direct suppliers to ship on lightweight, recyclable corrugated cardboard pallets. Doing so will save money, protect employees, reduce carbon footprints and advance zero waste goals. 

Pulling their weight 

Before 2009, IKEA used almost exclusively wood pallets. Today, more than 98 percent of its global inbound and outbound shipments are on corrugated pallets, cutting CO2e by more than 550,000 metric tons since 2012. Based on public and company reports, we estimate that IKEA has saved billions of dollars through its global “Handling Material — No Wood” program, largely by shipping an estimated 1.44 billion fewer pounds each year, eliminating wood pallet disposal and realizing corrugated recycling revenue. 

From 1991 to 2010, General Motors required suppliers to ship to its facilities on corrugated pallets. The program ended in the United States (but continued in Mexico) when a multinational wood pallet company convinced GM to switch to extra-heavy (70-pound) wood pallets. It seems that GM did not pay close attention to the impact the change would have on emissions — it was a different time — and/or failed to calculate the true enterprise cost of switching back to wood pallets.   Fortunately, the precedent- and game-changing numbers remain intact: 62 GM facilities achieved

From 1991 to 2010, General Motors required suppliers to ship to its facilities on corrugated pallets. The program ended in the United States (but continued in Mexico) when a multinational wood pallet company convinced GM to switch to extra-heavy (70-pound) wood pallets. It seems that GM did not pay close attention to the impact the change would have on emissions — it was a different time — and/or failed to calculate the true enterprise cost of switching back to wood pallets. 


Fortunately, the precedent- and game-changing numbers remain intact: 62 GM facilities achieved “zero waste” status during this time frame. GM also reported more than $2 billion in recycling revenue; revenue that surely has dropped off since the program’s termination. 

Most important, as GM proved for 19 years, America’s companies (and universities, hospitals and government agencies) have a choice when it comes to what pallets are delivered to their facilities. In many cases, turning the switch to corrugated requires little more than a letter to suppliers, or adding a few words to a supplier protocol or similar guidelines. 


The case against corrugated 

Leading U.S. retailers have argued that corrugated pallets are not sufficiently strong. It is true that corrugated pallet quality can vary and some applications are not suitable, but those issues are easily handled in spec-writing. The fact that IKEA ships and receives substantial loads on 36 million corrugated pallets per year — spanning five continents — belies the “sturdiness” argument. 

Others cite the costs that come with changes to materials handling and racking practices. This is often true, and IKEA can attest that making such changes was a prudent investment. 


Companies often point to per-pallet cost comparisons of wood versus corrugated, but a more complete analysis would factor in fuel savings, space optimization, recycling revenue, reduced injuries, operational efficiencies, less product damage, disposal costs and perhaps even carbon value. 

Finally, major retailers fairly point out that they reuse wood pallets for shipments downstream. But that does not change the fact that it requires one truck to deliver 1,800 corrugated pallets to their point of use, but 4.5 trucks to deliver the same number of wood pallets; that it takes one truck to move 400 wood pallets away from the store post-use versus tossing corrugated pallets into the bailer; and that pallets remain one of the largest components of landfill waste. 

Who needs retail? 

A disappointing but honest appraisal is that even leading sustainability retailers such as Whole Foods are committed to systems that force Seventh Generation, General Mills and other sustainability leading suppliers to ship on wood pallets — and that’s unlikely to change anytime soon. But beyond retailers, sustainably minded companies can look upstream to advance carbon reduction and zero-waste initiatives. 

“Even leading sustainability retailers such as Whole Foods are committed to systems that force Seventh Generation, General Mills and other sustainability leading suppliers to ship on wood pallets — and that’s unlikely to change anytime soon. But beyond retailers, sustainably minded companies can look upstream to advance carbon reduction and zero-waste initiatives.”

Could Tesla revive the GM supplier directive? Could General Mills direct that the tens of millions of empty corrugated cereal boxes delivered to its factories each year be shipped on corrugated pallets? Could Seventh Generation ask that empty plastic containers come on corrugated pallets? 

And, maybe even easier, could sectors such as hospitality and medical facilities that rarely ship downstream save money and reduce upstream footprints by similarly requesting that suppliers use lightweight, recyclable pallets? 

Change is hard. It’s also the essence of corporate sustainability. Leading companies literally are changing the world through responsible sourcing, clean energy use, process efficiencies and many other innovations in business practices that yield social, environmental and economic benefit. There is still much low-hanging fruit to be harvested, and the lowly pallet is still hanging on the tree, ready to be picked. 

Adam Pener

President

Green Ox Pallet Technology 

Original article link: https://www.greenbiz.com/article/sustainability-and-pallets-making-change-long-haul
Roger Ballentine President
Green Strategies, Inc. 

 

Tesla Model 3 Production Unveiling — What To Expect & How To Watch from CleanTechnica

July 28th, 2017 by Kyle Field

The Tesla Model 3 reveal in 2016 was the most anticipated vehicle reveal in history, and perhaps the most anticipated product reveal of any kind. More recently, production launch has been the most anticipated production launch of any vehicle since perhaps the Ford Model T.

The Tesla Model 3 reveal in 2016 was the most anticipated vehicle reveal in history, and perhaps the most anticipated product reveal of any kind. More recently, production launch has been the most anticipated production launch of any vehicle since perhaps the Ford Model T.
Humanity (and perhaps AI) will look back on the Model 3 as an iconic vehicle. Before the 3 launch, electric vehicles were merely niche products for fanatics. After the 3 launch, electric cars were mainstream. The inflection point was not a single moment in time but a progression, a gradual transition from black to white, but it is safe to say that the catalytic drop into the market that started the reaction was the initial Model 3 reveal event on March 31st, 2016, when the world saw the Model 3 for the very first time.

Before that moment, people wondered, people hoped, people hated (haters gonna hate), and skeptics scoffed. After the reveal, the haters were silenced as hundreds of thousands of reservations attempted to break the internet in parallel to the livestreaming of the event from the Tesla Design Studio in Hawthorne, California.
Before that moment, people wondered, people hoped, people hated (haters gonna hate), and skeptics scoffed. After the reveal, the haters were silenced as hundreds of thousands of reservations attempted to break the internet in parallel to the livestreaming of the event from the Tesla Design Studio in Hawthorne, California.

For the entire story on CleanTechnica