I’ve written before that:

When you think of green energy technology, you might think of things like wind mills, solar panels, or biofuels. While these advancements are certainly at the forefront of green energy, technology like computers, processing chips and electronic safety systems are also doing important work in maintaining the efficiency of such systems.

Bottom line, energy efficient actions is a renewable energy.  For example:

•  Making the switch to LEDs, or movement sensors, could save up to 80% of the energy used per bulb, compared to a standard lightbulb.

• Invest in a high-capacity solar battery which is an ideal backup electricity supply solution. It allows you to go ‘off grid’ if needed.

• Appliances and equipment that carry the Energy Star mark fall within the top 25% of the most energy efficient products, on average.

This great infographic has more ideas too. Enjoy!

Source: http://www.njpelectrical.com.au/


A solar installation crew hard at work in New York – photo courtesy of Kasselman Solar

A solar installation crew hard at work in New York – photo courtesy of Kasselman Solar

Solar has gone from being an expensive rarity to a common sight on rooftops in many places across the country. As a result, homeowners have switched from asking if solar is actually worth it to how much it costs. 

Unfortunately, determining how much solar would actually cost for your home isn’t simple. To give homeowners a better idea of true prices out there, Green Living Guy decided to do some research! 
First off, why is determining the cost of solar so difficult? There are several reasons for this:

1) Not all homes use the same amount of energy – this can even be true of homes that are right next to each other.

2) Different homes have different roof angles and receive different amounts of sun.

3) Rebates and incentives change from state to state, and even utility to utility.

4) Installers don’t tend to publish their prices, and pricing can vary widely from one installer to another for the same panels.

5) Prices have been dropping rapidly for the past ten years, making price studies from only a few years back completely inaccurate.

So how are homeowners supposed to know even a general ballpark for prices when considering purchasing solar? Well, we went looking better information, and we found several recent studies that help shed light on the actual cost of installing solar.

We looked at studies from both Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a federally-funded laboratory which does a large amount of research on all kinds of energy, and Solar to the People, an independent marketplace site that evaluates solar installers and publishes educational studies for homeowners.

The Lawrence Berkeley study looks at solar costs across the entire US, and is quite an in-depth study – 

Here are our takeaways from the Lawrence Berkeley study:

1) Residential solar prices have dropped enormously across the country in the past decade

– Home solar prices have dropped roughly 55% from 2005 to 2015. The average price of an installed watt of home solar in 2005 was $9.04. In 2015 installing that same watt cost $4.05.

Image and data source: Tracking the Sun report by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2016

Image and data source: Tracking the Sun report by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2016

2) The prices that homeowners pay per installed watt of installed solar within states varies– as you can see in the graph below, people pay a wide range of prices for each installed watt. So prices vary not only ACROSS states (you can see that California prices in 2015 are almost 20% HIGHER than New Jersey prices), but WITHIN states – we were surprised to the extent that homeowners within a state paid such different amounts per watt of installed solar. 

Image and data source: Tracking the Sun report by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2016

Image and data source: Tracking the Sun report by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2016

All this variation between states got us thinking – how much do installations cost overall versus just on a per-watt basis, and are there differences across regions WITHIN states?

For this part of our research, we turned to several studies that looked at two of the most popular places to install solar nationwide – California and New York. Lo and behold, it turns out that there are large variations within states, and you could be paying significantly more or less for solar than the state average depending on the region you live in.

We dug into Solar to the People’s study on the cost of solar panels in New York to understand how prices for home solar varied across the Empire State in the first six months of 2016. We were shocked to see the large variations you can see in the infographic below.

Image and data source – Solar to the People, 2016

Image and data source – Solar to the People, 2016

According to the data collected by Solar to the People, the average price for a home solar installation in New York state in the first half of 2016 was $16,426. Regional prices varied heavily for a full installation of home solar panels from a low of $12,361 in the Ithaca area to a high of $21,104 for solar on Long Island. The reasons for these price differences were primarily due the differences in state incentives. This incentive program is called the NY-Sun residential rebate program and is still available and going strong for upstate New York (where Ithaca is located), but is no longer available in Long Island. Long Island homeowners continue to go solar regardless, as they live in one of the highest cost areas for electricity in the country. 
Of course, there’s no way we can discuss regional solar costs without looking at the reigning king of home solar installations, California. We looked at Solar to the People’s California study to get some insight into if there are regional differences in the cost of installing solar in California. According to the study, the average cost of a home solar installation in California in 2015 was $18,675. 

Yet again, we saw there were sizable difference between the least and most expensive regions, though not nearly as large as New York. On average the highest-cost area for Solar in California was the Redding and Shasta / Cascades area at $20,698, and the least expensive was the Central Coast at $16,212. The differences in these prices seemed to be almost exclusively due to the size differences between installations in those two areas. The prices for home solar in the majority of the regions in the Golden State seemed to hover around the statewide average, like San Diego at $18,540 and Orange County at $18,866.

 

Image and data source – Solar to the People, 2016

Image and data source – Solar to the People, 2016

Hopefully our research has helped you understand a bit more about the national and regional costs of home solar installations! We think that knowledge is power that giving homeowners accurate information on solar is essential to help the renewable energy revolution keep on steaming ahead!

The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar. This is a production preview of the Jaguar I-PACE, which will be revealed next year and on the road in 2018. Customers can register now at jaguar.com to be one of the first I-PACE owners.

Here is Michelle Rodriguez from the Fast and Furious movie series and Avatar explaining the car. I love her OMG!! You don't know!!
Here is Michelle Rodriguez from the Fast and Furious movie series and Avatar explaining the car. I love her OMG!! You don’t know!!

http://digitalnewsagency.com//media/215149/embed/Jaguar’s engineering and design teams have torn up the rule book to create a bespoke electric architecture, matched with dramatic design. The result is no-compromise smart, five seat sports car and a performance SUV in one.

Source: Digital News Agency and Jaguar

The I-PACE Concept represents the next generation of electric vehicle design. It’s a dramatic, future-facing cab-forward design with a beautiful interior – the product of authentic Jaguar DNA, electric technology and contemporary craftsmanship.

The I-PACE Concept represents the next generation of electric vehicle design. It’s a dramatic, future-facing cab-forward design with a beautiful interior – the product of authentic Jaguar DNA, electric technology and contemporary craftsmanship.
Our virtual reality reveal today has pushed technology boundaries as well, and captures the hi-tech essence of the concept car. We only have one concept car and it is in LA for the reveal. For the first time, VR has allowed us share it across the globe in the most immersive way possible.”

This unique and world-first ‘social VR’ reveal is believed to be the largest live and connected VR event of its type to date. Throughout the day more than 300 guests were transported into a specially created life-like virtual space, into which, two of the car’s creators, Ian Callum and Ian Hoban were projected.

Source: Digital News Agency, Los Angeles, 14 November 2016

http://digitalnewsagency.com//media/215179/embed/

Sustainability and innovation are highlighted in Pittsburgh this holiday season as one of the city's famed bridges is awash in light and colors thanks to the Energy Flow bridge lighting installation, powered in part by wind energy. Photo credit: Roy Engelbrecht Pittsburgh Bicentennial

Sustainability and innovation are highlighted in Pittsburgh this holiday season as one of the city’s famed bridges is awash in light and colors thanks to the Energy Flow bridge lighting installation, powered in part by wind energy. Photo credit: Roy Engelbrecht Pittsburgh Bicentennial


PITTSBURGH, Nov. 17, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Pittsburgh’s forward-thinking commitment to innovation and sustainability will be reflected in a new addition to the city’s Comcast Light Up Night® launch of the holiday season on Friday, Nov. 18. With Downtown, the North Shore and the South Side aglow in lights and festivities drawing an anticipated crowd of 500,000, a new 27,000 multi-colored LED lighting display on the Rachel Carson Bridge (also known as the 9th Street Bridge) will beautify the night-time skyline with the help of environmentally friendly wind power.

Titled “Energy Flow,” the installation was designed by environmental artist Andrea Polli, who envisioned one of Pittsburgh’s sister bridges illuminated with wind power. Ron Gdovic, CEO WindStax Wind Power Systems, helped bring Polli’s vision to life by developing nanogrids and 16 specially designed wind turbines mounted on steel platforms and secured to the bridge. The wind turbines generate the main source of power for lighting the display.


More than an art display, the Energy Flow installation bridges Pittsburgh’s pioneering industrial past with its technology-driven future, making it a perfect endnote to Pittsburgh’s bicentennial celebration.

“It is fitting that this sustainable installation is mounted to the Rachel Carson Bridge, named for the noted environmental champion and Pittsburgh-area native,” said Mayor William Peduto, City of Pittsburgh.
The Rachel Carson Bridge is one of Pittsburgh’s Three Sisters, three prominent and nearly identical self-anchored suspension bridges spanning the Allegheny River and the first of their kind in the United States.

The installation has been more than a year in the making. The project was realized through the efforts of Mayor Peduto, Covestro LLC, the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership, Riverlife, the City of Pittsburgh, Duquesne Light Company and DQE Communications.

The Pittsburgh media and downtown commuters were given a sneak preview of the lighting installation tonight. All regional residents and visitors to the city will be able to enjoy the Energy Flow display throughout the holiday season and on select occasions in early 2017.

Source: Pittsburgh Bicentennial Committee, www.PGH200.com, Covestro LLC, Duquesne Light, Andrea Polli, WindStax® Wind Power Systems

This infographic delves into the struggles that people living in rural communities are facing with keeping up with technology and finds out what is being done by the government and other people in the rural communities, to help get these affected areas better connected in the 21st century or even living off the grid. Some people call this being Climate Resilient. 

Here’s the information about it from FuelFighter

Living in a rural location has its perks. It’s peaceful, it’s quiet, and you’re out the way of all that city centre pollution. Bliss. However, when it comes to keeping up with technology, it can become a bit of a nightmare.


In this piece, we’ll be delving into the struggles that people living in rural communities are facing and find out what is being done by the government and other people in the rural communities to help get these affected areas better connected in the 21st century.


For example, we’ll be showing you why rural communities have such a poor internet connection and what one MBE industry leader is doing to help. We’ll discover the future of deliveries to rural areas, take a look at a trust that is installing defibrillators in phone boxes and much more.

Living in a rural location has its perks. It’s peaceful, it’s quiet, and you’re out the way of all that city centre pollution. Bliss. However, when it comes to keeping up with technology, it can become a bit of a nightmare. In this piece, we’ll be delving into the struggles that people living in rural communities are facing and find out what is being done by the government and other people in the rural communities to help get these affected areas better connected in the 21st century. For example, we’ll be showing you why rural communities have such a poor internet connection and what one MBE industry leader is doing to help. We’ll discover the future of deliveries to rural areas, take a look at a trust that is installing defibrillators in phone boxes and much more.

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