Science Daily — University of California experts recently released their much-anticipated blueprint. That’s for fighting global warming. All by reducing the amount of carbon emitted. Especially when transportation fuels are used in California.

Low Carbon Fuel Standard

This “Low Carbon Fuel Standard” is designed to stimulate improvements. All in transportation-fuel technologies. For it is expected to become the foundation. Especially for similar initiatives. As well as in other states. That’s as well as nationally and internationally.

Description Biofuel picture from La Jolla. La Jolla is biotech mecca... The 92121 zip code, just North of San Diego, has the most biotech companies, 2.8x that of second place (South San Francisco).
Description
Biofuel picture from La Jolla. La Jolla is biotech mecca…
The 92121 zip code, just North of San Diego, has the most biotech companies, 2.8x that of second place (South San Francisco).

For the new standard was commissioned in January. All by California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. He asked the university’s top transportation-energy experts for help. All to design a standard for cleaner fuel. One that would reduce carbon emissions from fuels. I mean they are hoping by 10 percent by 2020.

In addition, carbon and other greenhouse gases trap heat. All within the Earth’s atmosphere. Moreover, they are a major cause of global climate change. Most noteworthy and in California, transportation fuels account for about 40 percent of all greenhouse-gas emissions. So cleaner fuels can help resolve this issue.

In addition, the standard’s authors are Professor Alex Farrell. Alex is the director of the Transportation Sustainability Research Center at UC Berkeley. Finally and Professor Daniel Sperling. Dan is the director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis.

Report 1

In Part 1 of their report which is to be completed in May. So Farrell and Sperling evaluated the technical feasibility of achieving the 10 percent cut by 2020. They also identified six scenarios. Most importantly and all based on a variety of different technologies. Those that could meet or exceed this goal. Moreover and concluded that the goal was ambitious but attainable. At the end of June, the California Air Resources Board voted to start working toward that goal. Finally with the new standard taking effect by January 2010.

Source: UC DAVIS