According to the Washington Examiner, US Senator from Michigan Debbie Stabenow urged the Senate not to take its scheduled recess next week to stay in the Capitol and pass funding for Flint, Mich.

The city of 100,000 people in eastern Michigan has been affected by a drinking water crisis for more than two years. That’s due to lead contamination brought on by a switch in water sources. Stabenow, a Democrat. For she said the Senate should not leave town until something is done.

According to the Washington Examiner, US Senator from Michigan Debbie Stabenow urged the Senate not to take its scheduled recess next week to stay in the Capitol and pass funding for Flint, Mich.
Michigan senator says the Senate should stay and pass funding to help the Flint water crisis. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

 

“We should have acted sooner in the United States Senate. Moreover and sent a bill to the House. All so that we could help Flint rebuild their water system,” she said.

For the rest of the Washington Examiner story by KYLE FELDSCHER(@KYLE_FELDSCHER) • 4/28/16 1:56 PM

Agreement

Congress has finally passed an agreement to provide $170 million in long-awaited assistance for Flint. In addition and other communities affected by lead.  The bipartisan agreement, championed by Senator Stabenow, Senator Peters and Congressman Kildee. For it passed the Senate 78-21. That’s as part of the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act.  This agreement also closely mirrors legislation that passed the Senate in September by a margin of 95-3. For it now goes to the desk of the President for his signature.

The agreement provides access to $100 million in funding to help fix Flint’s drinking water infrastructure; funding to activate at least $200 million in low-interest loans to upgrade water infrastructure in communities in Michigan and across the country; $50 million to address the health care needs of children who have been exposed to lead; authority for the State of Michigan to forgive $20 million in past drinking water loans to Flint; and a requirement that EPA warn the public within 24 hours of high lead levels in drinking water if a state fails to do so.