Protect Our Winters Heads to Washington D.C. with Professional Athletes and Outdoor Industry Leaders to Discuss Bipartisan Climate Solutions

BOULDER, CO— On September 13, 2017, Protect Our Winters (POW) will convene in Washington D.C. with professional athletes and outdoor industry leaders to discuss bipartisan solutions to climate change. Athletes in attendance will include: Founder of Protect Our Winters and Jones Snowboards, Jeremy Jones, Olympians Gretchen Bleiler, Alex Deibold, and Kaitlyn Farrington; skiers Julian Carr, Angel Collinson, Hadley Hammer, and Michelle Parker; snowboarders Josh Dirksen and Forrest Shearer; fly fisherman Hilary Hutcheson; climber Matt Segal; and Polar explorer Eric Larsen. In addition, representatives from Aspen Skiing Company, Burton, Fishpond, Keen, Orvis, and the California Ski Industry Association will be in attendance. 

Throughout the day attendees will meet with the following offices: Congressman McClintock (R, CA-04), Congresswoman Mia Love (R, UT-04), Congressman Tipton (R, CO-03), Congressman Walden (R, OR-02), Congressman Welch (D, VT At Large), Senator Daines (R-MT), Senator Gardener (R-CO), and Senator Murkowski (R-AK). 

“For Burton Snowboards, warming winters are a business bottom line issue. We are excited to head to Washington with Protect Our Winters to meet with lawmakers to discuss how we can address climate change’s impacts on the $887 billion-dollar outdoor recreation economy,” said Donna Carpenter, CEO of Burton Snowboards.

Protect Our Winters Heads to Washington D.C. with Professional Athletes and Outdoor Industry Leaders to Discuss Bipartisan Climate Solutions
In addition to one-on-one meetings with members of Congress, the group is excited to attend a hearing held by the bipartisan House Climate Solutions Caucus on climate change’s impacts on tourism and outdoor recreation. The Caucus is a group of U.S. Representatives with a mission to educate members on economically viable options to reduce climate risk and to explore bipartisan policy options that address the impacts, causes, and challenges of our changing climate. Membership is kept even between Democrats and Republicans; the Caucus currently boasts 52 members. Pro fisher Hilary Hutcheson, Olympic snowboarder Gretchen Bleiler, and VP of sustainability at Aspen Skiing Company Auden Schendler will testify at this hearing.

“As a professional snowboarder, it’s true that my idea of a good time isn’t necessarily putting on a suit and heading to Capitol Hill, but I am energized by the rapid growth of the Bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus,” said Jeremy Jones, Founder of Protect Our Winters and Jones Snowboards. “We look forward to meeting with the Caucus and talking solutions.”

Source: Protect Our Winters www.protectourwinters.org

New York’s Hudson Valley Revs Up for Electric Vehicles with New Campaign – Green Transportation – MOTHER EARTH NEWS

While this story is from 2016, aka I wrote it a year ago, I’m still Program Manager with Drive Electric Hudson Valley and we are expanding from this post. 

Here’s a portion of the story. 

The first electric vehicle (EV) consumer education program in the Hudson Valley goes live this fall. For the growing population of consumers who are curious about EVs and want to learn more, Drive Electric Hudson Valley will provide consumer workshops, informational materials, and test drive opportunities throughout the fall.

A project of Sustainable Hudson Valley (SHV), Drive Electric HV is supported in part by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). It’s led by Seth Leitman, author and consumer advocate who reaches tens of thousands on social media and at special events as the Green Living Guy.

Leitman has worked for the New York Power Authority (NYPA) and NYSERDA on developing and implementing major marketing and infrastructure programs for electric vehicles. In addition, he test drives the greenest cars for reviews for other major publications regularly (including Mother Earth New).

Seth will partner with mechanical engineer and clean technology-bilingual outreach expert Hugo Jule to inform and inspire green living and technology enthusiasts throughout the Hudson Valley.
For the entire please visit. 

http://www.motherearthnews.com/green-transportation/electric-vehicle-campaign-zbcz1610

ROCKET MAN: Explore Elon Musk’s wisdom on innovation and business

In the book: ROCKET MAN: Elon Musk In His Own Words (Agate B2, February 14, 2017, 978-1-57284-214-4), edited by Jessica Easto, collects more than 200 of entrepreneur Elon Musk’s most insightful (and occasionally eccentric) quotes, covering topics ranging from leadership, business, and education to innovation, artificial intelligence, and space.

Musk has been called the “real life Tony Stark” for his ability to capture the public’s imagination with almost inconceivable feats of engineering and technological advancement. The South African–born entrepreneur who made his first fortune with internet companies such as PayPal has risen to global prominence as the visionary CEO of both Tesla Motors and SpaceX, two companies with self-proclaimed missions to improve life as we know it and better secure the future of humanity. 

No matter the topic, Musk always brings a unique eye to the subject at hand, making his quotes both entertaining and insightful. In the words of Richard Branson, “Whatever skeptics have said can’t be done, Elon has gone out and made real.” Although he may be inimitable, there is no better way to learn from Rocket Man Elon Musk than through his own words.
Elon Musk

No matter the topic, Musk always brings a unique eye to the subject at hand, making his quotes both entertaining and insightful. In the words of Richard Branson,

“Whatever skeptics have said can’t be done, Elon has gone out and made real.” Although he may be inimitable, there is no better way to learn from Rocket Man Elon Musk than through his own words.

Here are some of his statements:

“I do think it’s worth thinking about whether what you’re doing is going to result in disruptive change or not. If it’s just incremental, it’s unlikely to be something major. It’s got to be something that’s substantially better than what’s gone on before.”—SXSW Conference, March 9, 2013

“I don’t think everything needs to change the world, you know. . . . Just say: ‘Is what I’m doing as useful as it could be?’” —STVP Future Fest, October 7, 2015 

“Fundamentally, if you don’t have a compelling product at a compelling price, you don’t have a great company.” —Inc. 5000 Conference, 2008

“If you go back a few hundred years, what we take for granted today would seem like magic—being able to talk to people over long distances, to transmit images, flying, accessing vast amounts of data like an oracle. . . . So engineering is, for all intents and purposes, magic, and who wouldn’t want to be a magician?” —Forbes, March 26, 2012

“Certainly, in the beginning, when I told people I was trying to create a rocket company, they thought I was crazy. That seemed like a very improbable thing. And I agreed with them—I think it was improbable. But sometimes the improbable happens.” —Living Legends of Aviation awards dinner, January 22, 2010

“What a lot of people don’t appreciate is that technology does not automatically improve. It only improves if a lot of really strong engineering talent is applied to the problem. . . . There are many examples in history where civilizations have reached a certain technology level and then have fallen well below that and then recovered only millennia later.”​ —International Astronautical Congress, September 27, 2016

“We don’t think too much about what competitors are doing because I think it’s important to be focused on making the best possible products. It’s maybe analogous to what they say about if you’re in a race: don’t worry about what the other runners are doing—just run.” —StartmeupHK Venture Forum, January 26, 2016

“We’re already a cyborg. You have a digital version of yourself or partial version of yourself online in the form of your e-mails and your social media and all the things that you do. And you have, basically, superpowers with your computer and your phone and the applications that are there. You have more power than the president of the United States had 20 years ago. You can answer any question; you can videoconference with anyone anywhere; you can send a message to millions of people instantly. You just do incredible things.” —Code Conference, June 1, 2016

“Our goal when we created Tesla a decade ago was the same as it is today: to accelerate the advent of sustainable transport by bringing compelling mass market electric cars to market as soon as possible. If we could have done that with our first product, we would have, but that was simply impossible to achieve for a startup company that had never built a car and that had one technology iteration and no economies of scale. Our first product was going to be expensive no matter what it looked like, so we decided to build a sports car, as that seemed like it had the best chance of being competitive with its gasoline alternatives.” —“The Mission of Tesla,” November 18, 2013
“Our goal when we created Tesla a decade ago was the same as it is today: to accelerate the advent of sustainable transport by bringing compelling mass market electric cars to market as soon as possible. If we could have done that with our first product, we would have, but that was simply impossible to achieve for a startup company that had never built a car and that had one technology iteration and no economies of scale. Our first product was going to be expensive no matter what it looked like, so we decided to build a sports car, as that seemed like it had the best chance of being competitive with its gasoline alternatives.” —“The Mission of Tesla,” November 18, 2013 

“The goal of SpaceX is to revolutionize space travel. The long-term goal is to establish Mars as a self-sustaining civilization as well as to just kind of have a more exciting future.” —hitRECord on TV, February 1, 2014

“I’m not saying we’ll do it [become multiplanetary], to be sure. The odds are we won’t succeed. But if something is important enough, then you should do it anyway.” —Smithsonian magazine, December 2012

“In terms of our competitiveness, it mostly comes down to our pace of innovation. Our pace of innovation is much, much faster than the big aerospace companies or the country-driven systems. This is generally true. If you look at innovation from large companies and from smaller companies, smaller companies are generally better at innovating than larger companies. It has to be that way from a Darwinian standpoint because smaller companies would just die if they didn’t try innovating.” —MIT Aeronautics and Astronautics Centennial Symposium, October 24, 2014 

“I’m a big believer in: don’t ask investors to invest their money if you’re not prepared to invest your money. I really believe in the opposite philosophy of other people’s money. It just doesn’t seem right to me that if you ask other people to invest that you shouldn’t also invest. . . . I’d rather lose my money than any of my friends’ money or investors’ money.” —2016 Tesla Annual Shareholders Meeting, May 31, 2016

Reprinted with permission from Rocket Man edited by Jessica Easto, Agate B2, 2017.

 

The Wonderful Thing About Living Green: A Conversation With EMA Board Member Stana Katic

The Wonderful Thing About Living Green: A Conversation With EMA Board Member Stana Katic   1. How and when did you become conscious about how your lifestyle affects the planet?  I think a lot of it was just part of my upbringing. People in my family have always had gardens & fruit trees; a lot of my family had household livestock. So, the importance of chemical-free food sources and

1. How and when did you become conscious about how your lifestyle affects the planet?
I think a lot of it was just part of my upbringing. People in my family have always had gardens & fruit trees; a lot of my family had household livestock. So, the importance of chemical-free food sources and “nothing goes to waste” mentality was something I was raised with. I suspect caring for the environment was a natural outcropping from that foundation.

2. How important is it for celebrities & influencers to encourage people to be green?

People with a large outreach on social media can be particularly helpful educators. Lifestyle choices that are kind to our natural surroundings are often fun, healthy and easy. Highlighting helpful pointers can do an immense amount to open up new and improved ideas on “how to do it better.”

We can also shed light on current events that are perhaps not covered by mainstream media but are particularly vital to the environment.

Finally, public individuals can be key in giving new green technology the PR boost needed to leap into the marketplace and make products accessible and affordable for everyone.

3. Do you feel your audience is starting to adopt some of your eco-friendly habits?

EMA Board Member Amy Smart posted a video highlighting a clever way to make composting easier. It was serendipitous as I had been looking for more efficient ways to create good, juicy compost for my fruit trees. So, as an audience member myself, I can say I’m definitely adopting other people’s nature-friendly habits.

4. With the 27th Annual EMA Awards around the corner, what is your fondest EMA Awards memory?

I was part of the committee judging documentaries one year. It was the year GMO OMG and Virunga were nominated. All of the documentaries that year were impactful and entertaining. I was moved by them and made a point of sending a shout-out for each one of those projects on my social media platforms. It was a privilege to serve to broaden their reach & audience through the EMA Awards.

5. Do you think people in Europe & Canada are more inclined to be green than here in the US?

Not necessarily. City infrastructure like waste-management (with accountable nation-wide recycling & composting receptacles) or efficient public transit may be more developed outside of the US– Japan is admirable on both of these fronts.
But as far as the average American is concerned, I see many smaller towns and communities that are very diligent about protecting natural waterways from polluting agents, for instance. And then there’s the whole “farm-to-table” movement that is bringing a larger demand for farmers-market-styled, locally-sourced foods.

The wonderful thing about living “green” is that it often entails simple decisions that in many ways create a healthier & more satisfying lifestyle; and I think Americans –especially small farmers and green tech innovators– are doing a great job of leading the way to fueling our bodies and our communities into a healthy and lucrative future.

Source: Environmental Media Association

Edina Tokodi five-part eco-art installation open to public at Rutherford Park’s ephemeral library on July 29

MONTREAL, July 28, 2017 /CNW/ – World Wildlife Fund Canada is celebrating the richness of Montréal’s biodiversity with a five-part eco-art installation by Edina Tokodi, one of the originators of the “green guerilla” art movement and founder of the Mosstika creative studio.

As of July 29, the installation was open to visitors of the “ephemeral library” in Rutherford Park (part of the Promenade Fleuve-Montagne at the entrance to Mount Royal), which runs until Oct. 31. 
The installation is made of engraved plywood panels and vegetable mosses, and showcases native species such as the red fox, map turtle, common milkweed and wild strawberry.

Edina Tokodi five-part eco-art installation open to public at Rutherford Park's ephemeral library on July 29
Edina Tokodi five-part eco-art installation open to public at Rutherford Park’s ephemeral library on July 29

Sophie Paradis, director of Quebec region for WWF-Canada, says: 
“Here in Montreal, our organization works on projects to promote urban biodiversity both on land and in the water, including Biopolis and Blue Montreal. We’re participating in the Promenade Fleuve-Montage to encourage communities to connect with nature in the urban environment. Combining art and ecology is a creative and positive way to educate people about the importance of biodiversity and mobilize them to ‘green’ and ‘blue’ their neighbourhoods.”

Planting biodiversity in five workshops

WWF-Canada will also offer five free public workshops in the ephemeral library in August and September. The workshops are designed to support Montreal’s urban biodiversity by encouraging participants to contribute to the flowering of native species in their communities.

Aug. 11 and 18: The Seed Explosion: Learn to create seed bombs.

Sept. 9, 16 and 23: Wildflower Workshop: Learn how to harvest, sort and bag local wildflower seeds.

For additional details and times of the workshops, stay tuned and follow WWF-Canada en français on Facebook : facebook.com/WWFCanadafrancais

Montreal’s biodiversity by the numbers

1,060 species of vascular plants

359 species of birds

180 species of bees

88 species of fish

13 species of amphibians

Eight species of reptiles

10 wildlife species of special status

The ephemeral library is located on the Promenade Fleuve-Montagne in Rutherford Park on the McTavish Reservoir. It runs from Thursday to Sunday, between July 29 and October 31, 2017.

Source: World Wildlife Fund Canada