How to Recycle Old Technology with Help from Staples

According to a recent survey conducted by Staples and Survey Monkey, nearly 80% of respondents have old technology sitting around and the majority (51%) don’t know where to recycle it.

Here is the survey presentation for everyone to check out but here are some of the questions asked.  I think it’s important to show the questions because it can “start the conversation” at your place.

1. Do you have old technology sitting around? If so, how many pieces?
2. Do general consumers recycle their tech currently?
3. Do they know why it’s important to do so?
4. Do they know where to drop off their devices for recycling?

Start thinking about these questions img_0176-1folks!! It’s appropriate to use Staples and recycle your electronics! Like yesterday!

As mentioned in a previous story, recyclers will also receive a Staples® eCash card when they trade in their eligible technology in store or online. Technology with no trade-in value will still be recycled responsibly at no charge to the guests, despite the brand or condition of the devices. They will even recycle items not purchased at Staples for FREE!

EPA Stats on eWaste in America

“Already, the United States generates almost 2.5 million tons of electronic waste per year – and that number will only grow. Used electronics have materials in them that can be recovered and recycled, reducing the economic costs and environmental impacts of securing and processing new materials for new products,” said EPA Administrator Lisa. P. Jackson.

“The SMM Electronics Challenge will help us ensure that we are doing all we can to repurpose or safely dispose of the cell phones, computers and other devices we use every day – all while helping to build a robust market for electronics recycling in the United States.”

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As the volume of used electronics continues to grow in the U.S. and the world, so has the importance of safely managing and recycling used electronics. Electronics are made of valuable resources such as precious metals, copper, plastic and glass – all of which require energy to mine and manufacture. Recycling or reusing these electronics conserves these materials and prevents greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution.

What is extremely important here folks!
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Let’s Regroup Folks! What’s Exciting here is that Staples makes it easy and accessible to recycle electronics that you can use toward cash. If not, no worries, they will recycle it for you.  Then  no computers end up in landfills!!

More Clarity as to Why It Matters:

1. According to the USEPA, in 2013, Americans generated about 254 million tons of trash and recycled and composted about 87 million tons of this material.

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2. Staples has collected more than 26 million pounds of customer e-waste annually that would have otherwise ended up in landfills.

3. Recycling electronics also prevents valuable materials from going into the waste stream. A long-term approach towards electronics stewardship is necessary both at work and at home.

You see, Staples is here to help every day with their FREE technology recycling program. People can bring in their old computers, cell phones, computer monitors and more to any Staples location and Staples will responsibly recycle the old tech for FREE.

5 Terrible Things That Happen When You Don’t Recycle

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, America produces over 258 million tons of waste every year ― which is close to a ton of trash per American citizen. The EPA believes as much as 75 percent of that waste to be recyclable or reusable, but instead of properly disposing of unwanted goods, many Americans choose to carelessly toss anything and everything into the garbage can. The results of this behavior are quickly becoming disastrous, impacting not only natural environments but also urban areas and human livelihoods. Here are a few ways failing to recycle negatively impacts the world around us.

1. Landfill Growth
Nearly all of America’s trash goes into landfills, which are essentially gigantic midden heaps that are eventually covered with soil and potentially used for urban development. The positive idea behind landfills is that trash will eventually decompose and settle, turning into fertile land. The problem is that much of our waste is not biodegradable; plastics require between 10 and 1,000 years to begin breaking down, and even then, the chemicals used in them can leach into groundwater and destroy surrounding environments.


2. Marine Pollution

Not all garbage is safely tucked into a landfill. At least 10 percent of all plastics created have found their way into the oceans, creating enormous gyres where the non-biodegradable waste is more plentiful than plankton. Most of the pollution comes from poor waste management on land, but some is dumped by unscrupulous ocean liners. The plastics wreak havoc on marine environments, as animals ingest or become entangled in the waste.

3. Incineration

For many, burning trash seems a viable solution to land and water pollution. However, incineration might be even more disastrous than landfills. For one, many products and packaging materials are made using toxic chemicals that are released into the air during the burning process. For another, glass as well as many plastics do not burn except at exceedingly high temperatures, which requires excessive amounts of fuel ― which itself releases dangerous emissions. Studies have found that air pollution causes all sorts of terrible diseases, from chronic asthma and cancer to birth defects.

4. Resource Waste

It isn’t just the items or materials themselves that are wasted when you throw something away; all the effort and energy used to create those items are also squandered. Between 2.5 and 4 percent of U.S. energy consumption is devoted to the manufacturing of plastic and plastic products; what’s more, at least 24 gallons of water is used to create just one pound of plastic, and about 2.5 million plastic bottles are produced every hour. Those resources could be diverted to more beneficial endeavors if everyone recycled more.

5. Economic Trouble

Though it might seem an economic advantage to create disposable goods that must be repurchased, pollution actually hinders economic advancement in notable ways. For example, many beaches experience lower tourism because the sand and water is covered in trash; fishing and shipping industries have reportedly suffered losses of $365 million and $279 million thanks to debris-clogged waterways. Less trash is almost synonymous with more profit for much of the economy.

How to Reduce Trash the Right Way

Though some waste is inevitable, it is possible to drastically reduce the amount of trash you personally produce. For example, one woman committed to a minimal-plastic lifestyle and managed to produce less than 16 ounces of waste over a two-year period. Not everyone has the luxury of avoiding plastic and packaging so thoroughly, but there are a number of effective ways you can increase your recycling efforts.

• First, you should strive to reduce the amount of purchases you make. This doesn’t necessarily mean becoming minimalist; instead, you should merely consider investing in a few well-designed and manufactured products rather than many cheap and disposable ones.

• Next, you should research what objects around your home can be reused. In fact, most things can find new life, and many charities gladly pick up or take in items you don’t want to sell. Some of these items will directly improve the lives of the needy, but others, especially valuables like digital devices on up to larger items like broken-down cars or boats, can be refurbished and sold for funds to benefit charities.

• Finally, you should learn more about recycling services in your area. Not all cities have the resources to recycle all types of materials. Instead of tossing any paper, plastic, or glass good in the recycling bin, you might need to find facilities designed to recycle specific goods. Items that are improperly recycled are likely to end up as pollution.

The E-Waste Problem and How to Help created by Digital Doc

Sustainable Tourism Along Dominican Republic’s North Coast for Green Living Guy and Green Travel Girl Brands

Since Green Travel Girl website just relaunched we thought it best to set it off with a trip to the Dominican Republic. This event was fully sponsored and we thank them for it.

The North Coast region, which includes Samaná, Cabarete and Puerto Plata, is comprised of pristine beaches, lush green valleys and palm-covered mountains. The beautiful landscape provides a wide-range of sustainable attractions unique to Dominican Republic. From nature trekking to snorkeling, this was an ideal trip for travelers with a passion for exploration, adventure and supporting the local economy.

The Original Green Travel Girl got to:

Slide down waterfalls at the 27 Waterfalls of Damajagua

Snorkel the coral reefs of Sosua Bay

Experience the ultimate in watersports in Cabarete, the Kite Surf Capital of the World

Learn about sustainable and aquaponic farming practices of area resorts

Participate in a surf lesson

Tour the Amber Mine

Go for a swim and hike at Blue Lagoon Cenote

Took in the sites from the Teleférico Cable Car in Puerto Plata

Not only is sustainable tourism an incredibly important component of any economy, but the United Nations has declared 2017 “The Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development,” which adds another interesting angle to share with your readers, who are so passionate about sustainability.

GOVERNOR CUOMO ANNOUNCES NEW CAMPAIGN TO INSTALL CHARGING STATIONS AND PROMOTE ELECTRIC VEHICLE USE ACROSS NEW YORK STATE

Supports Governor Cuomo’s Charge NY initiative; Will Help Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions 40 Percent by 2030
Largest Contributor to Greenhouse Gas Emissions is Transportation Sector; Accounts for Nearly 40 Percent of Emissions in New York State

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced a new electric vehicle campaign that includes the installation of charging stations, incentives for employers to encourage employees to drive electric vehicles and extensive public education and outreach. The increased use of electric vehicles will help the state in achieving its goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent by 2030. The campaign, which supports the Governor’s Charge NY initiative, will be overseen by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

“This multi-pronged campaign will help in this administration’s efforts to fight climate change, strengthen infrastructure to support the use of electric cars, and help reduce New York’s carbon footprint on our roadways,” Governor Cuomo said. “With these actions, we are taking another step toward a cleaner, greener and more sustainable New York for all.”

Work on the projects will start immediately and will include the installation of 450 charging stations across the state. Of these, approximately 150 will be located at workplaces throughout New York, supporting Governor Cuomo’s State of the State proposal for the construction of 500 new workplace charging stations. The units will be installed in Rochester, Syracuse, Buffalo, Utica, Albany, the Hudson Valley, Westchester County, New York City and Long Island.

“I’m pleased with the progress we’re making in the energy sector but we can’t cut greenhouse gasses and reach our emissions reduction goals without also making inroads in the transportation sector,” said Richard Kauffman, Chairman of Energy and Finance for New York. “State-wide campaigns to promote the use of electric vehicles will go far to help New York reach its emissions reductions goals and combat climate change.”

John B. Rhodes, President and CEO, NYSERDA, said , “This comprehensive campaign will help New York meet Governor Cuomo’s clean transportation goals and reduce our carbon footprint. Each project is vital to the success of New York’s nation-leading energy strategy, so we can ensure a cleaner and healthier environment for all New Yorkers.”

Additional projects in this campaign include:

· Working with New York City-area public and private employers to create an incentive program specifically for their employees to encourage them to buy electric vehicles;

· Conducting outreach to employers statewide to educate them on the benefits of providing workplace charging stations for their employees;

· Hosting public test drive and ride events;

· Providing innovative financing to make installing charging stations more economically viable for site owners;

· And developing tourism routes specifically for electric vehicle owners that will highlight charging station locations in the Mid-Hudson Valley, including in the Catskills.

In addition, Rochester will launch a pilot to become an electric vehicle model city. The goal is to demonstrate how developing an electric vehicle ecosystem can increase electric vehicle adoption and prepare a community for long-term electric vehicle growth. State, city and community leaders worked together to identify actions to support Rochester’s evolution into an electric vehicle model city, including adding electric vehicles to the city fleet, installing charging stations, creating a speaker’s bureau for community events and training for local dealerships. 
The projects will be managed by three contractors – EV Connect, Energetics and Calstart — for a total of $4.8 million. Each contractor is responsible for different elements at specific locations, though all will be installing charging stations and administering marketing and outreach programs.

This electric vehicle campaign continues Governor Cuomo’s ongoing support to grow the number of electric vehicles in New York. Last fall, he announced $3 million for rebates through the Environmental Protection Fund for municipalities to purchase or lease zero-emission vehicles, such as battery electric and hydrogen vehicles, for their fleets. 

Over the summer, Sustainable Hudson Valley kicked off its Drive Electric Hudson Valley campaign to educate consumers about electric vehicles, which was supported by NYSERDA.

The state has also revised regulations to clarify charging station ownership rules, and supported research and demonstration projects on new plug-in electric car technologies and policies. In addition, the New York Power Authority has invited municipalities to tap into a master contract that offers better pricing for the supply, installation and maintenance of charging stations. 

The Governor has also announced the availability of another $3 million to help eligible municipalities and rural electricity cooperatives purchase electric vehicles for use in their municipal use fleets.

Source: Charge NY, Reforming the Energy Vision, www.ny.gov/REV4NY, NYSERDA

Reducing Your Carbon Footprint in 8 Different Ways

Climate change is an issue that is hanging like a sword above all of our heads. The planet is suffering due to the rising level of carbon pollution. We must try to reduce our carbon footprint to reduce some pressure on the environment. Let us look at 8 ways to do so. 


Reduce your Driving

Ditch your car and walk or ride a bike whenever possible. Carpool to work or school and choose public transport as much as you can. Simple steps like that help in cutting down CO2 emissions significantly by spreading them out over many riders.


Reduce Water Usage 

You can reduce your water consumption by washing your car less often, installing drip irrigation to ensure that the plants receive only the amount they need and using climate-appropriate plants at your home. You must make water-efficient choices when you purchase bathroom and kitchen fixtures such as shower heads, dishwashers, faucet heats, etc. I 

Reuse and Recycle

When you make any product from scratch, you have to use a lot of energy on extracting resources, manufacturing them, packaging and transporting them. You can help in reducing the carbon footprint by using recycled products and reusing goods such as plastic bottles and glass containers


Use Alternative Sources of Energy

You can reduce your consumption of fossil fuels by using alternative sources of energy. Use wind, hydro, solar and geothermal energy and try to advocate about the same.


Light Up Differently 

Switch your light bulbs at home with light emitting diodes (LED). One LED helps in reducing up to 2000 pounds of carbon dioxide pollution during its lifetime. Therefore, by switching every light bulb with them you can drastically reduce the amount of electricity required to light up your house. Imagine what would happen if every house in the country did that!

Read the News Thoughtfully

There has been an ongoing debate of whether consuming news digitally is actually better than its print cousin. It has been said that reading the news digitally helps in saving trees as you no longer have to cut them to make paper, however, at the same time it has been argued that even surfing the web expends various amounts of energy depending on the device being used. The best way to go about it is to be mindful of how you choose to get your news. If you prefer print, recycle your papers instead of throwing them out. If you like the digital medium, opt for an unplugged laptop instead of a plugged-in device for the majority of your browsing time.

Telecommute and Teleconference 

Telecommuting is the practice of doing work remotely using the internet instead of fighting against the traffic to do the same work in an office. More and more companies are encouraging their employees to telecommute as it is quite effective. Long gone are the days when companies would send their employees to long distances via flights just to attend one meeting. It’s a waste of time and burdens the environment with huge amounts of CO2. Cut down a few trips and teleconference instead. You can’t completely reduce your CO2 footprint through these practices, but as they say — something is better than nothing.  


Plant a tree

Sounds obvious, but it is still one of the most efficient ways to slashing your carbon footprint. Trees not only provide shade and oxygen but also consume carbon dioxide. According to Urban Forestry Network, a single young tree is responsible for absorbing 13 pounds of carbon dioxide every year. As the tree grows, this amount adds up to 48 pounds. A 10 year old tree releases enough oxygen to support two human beings. So, go ahead and plant more trees!

By making smart and informed decisions such like recycling waste will go a long way in making the planet a little greener. 

Author Bio 
Erich Lawson is passionate about saving environment by effective recycling. He has written a wide array of articles on how modern recycling equipments can be used by industries to reduce monthly garbage bills and increase recycling revenue. You can learn more about environment savings techniques by visiting Northern California Compactors, Inc blog