5 Terrible Things That Happen When You Don’t Recycle

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, America produces over 258 million tons of waste every year ― which is close to a ton of trash per American citizen. The EPA believes as much as 75 percent of that waste to be recyclable or reusable, but instead of properly disposing of unwanted goods, many Americans choose to carelessly toss anything and everything into the garbage can. The results of this behavior are quickly becoming disastrous, impacting not only natural environments but also urban areas and human livelihoods. Here are a few ways failing to recycle negatively impacts the world around us.

1. Landfill Growth
Nearly all of America’s trash goes into landfills, which are essentially gigantic midden heaps that are eventually covered with soil and potentially used for urban development. The positive idea behind landfills is that trash will eventually decompose and settle, turning into fertile land. The problem is that much of our waste is not biodegradable; plastics require between 10 and 1,000 years to begin breaking down, and even then, the chemicals used in them can leach into groundwater and destroy surrounding environments.


2. Marine Pollution

Not all garbage is safely tucked into a landfill. At least 10 percent of all plastics created have found their way into the oceans, creating enormous gyres where the non-biodegradable waste is more plentiful than plankton. Most of the pollution comes from poor waste management on land, but some is dumped by unscrupulous ocean liners. The plastics wreak havoc on marine environments, as animals ingest or become entangled in the waste.

3. Incineration

For many, burning trash seems a viable solution to land and water pollution. However, incineration might be even more disastrous than landfills. For one, many products and packaging materials are made using toxic chemicals that are released into the air during the burning process. For another, glass as well as many plastics do not burn except at exceedingly high temperatures, which requires excessive amounts of fuel ― which itself releases dangerous emissions. Studies have found that air pollution causes all sorts of terrible diseases, from chronic asthma and cancer to birth defects.

4. Resource Waste

It isn’t just the items or materials themselves that are wasted when you throw something away; all the effort and energy used to create those items are also squandered. Between 2.5 and 4 percent of U.S. energy consumption is devoted to the manufacturing of plastic and plastic products; what’s more, at least 24 gallons of water is used to create just one pound of plastic, and about 2.5 million plastic bottles are produced every hour. Those resources could be diverted to more beneficial endeavors if everyone recycled more.

5. Economic Trouble

Though it might seem an economic advantage to create disposable goods that must be repurchased, pollution actually hinders economic advancement in notable ways. For example, many beaches experience lower tourism because the sand and water is covered in trash; fishing and shipping industries have reportedly suffered losses of $365 million and $279 million thanks to debris-clogged waterways. Less trash is almost synonymous with more profit for much of the economy.

How to Reduce Trash the Right Way

Though some waste is inevitable, it is possible to drastically reduce the amount of trash you personally produce. For example, one woman committed to a minimal-plastic lifestyle and managed to produce less than 16 ounces of waste over a two-year period. Not everyone has the luxury of avoiding plastic and packaging so thoroughly, but there are a number of effective ways you can increase your recycling efforts.

• First, you should strive to reduce the amount of purchases you make. This doesn’t necessarily mean becoming minimalist; instead, you should merely consider investing in a few well-designed and manufactured products rather than many cheap and disposable ones.

• Next, you should research what objects around your home can be reused. In fact, most things can find new life, and many charities gladly pick up or take in items you don’t want to sell. Some of these items will directly improve the lives of the needy, but others, especially valuables like digital devices on up to larger items like broken-down cars or boats, can be refurbished and sold for funds to benefit charities.

• Finally, you should learn more about recycling services in your area. Not all cities have the resources to recycle all types of materials. Instead of tossing any paper, plastic, or glass good in the recycling bin, you might need to find facilities designed to recycle specific goods. Items that are improperly recycled are likely to end up as pollution.

The E-Waste Problem and How to Help created by Digital Doc
Advertisements

Sustainable Tourism Along Dominican Republic’s North Coast for Green Living Guy and Green Travel Girl Brands

Since Green Travel Girl website just relaunched we thought it best to set it off with a trip to the Dominican Republic. This event was fully sponsored and we thank them for it.

The North Coast region, which includes Samaná, Cabarete and Puerto Plata, is comprised of pristine beaches, lush green valleys and palm-covered mountains. The beautiful landscape provides a wide-range of sustainable attractions unique to Dominican Republic. From nature trekking to snorkeling, this was an ideal trip for travelers with a passion for exploration, adventure and supporting the local economy.

The Green Travel Girl travel story were able to:

Slide down waterfalls at the 27 Waterfalls of Damajagua

Snorkel the coral reefs of Sosua Bay

Experience the ultimate in watersports in Cabarete, the Kite Surf Capital of the World

Learn about sustainable and aquaponic farming practices of area resorts

Participate in a surf lesson

Tour the Amber Mine

Go for a swim and hike at Blue Lagoon Cenote

Took in the sites from the Teleférico Cable Car in Puerto Plata

Not only is sustainable tourism an incredibly important component of any economy, but the United Nations has declared 2017 “The Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development,” which adds another interesting angle to share with your readers, who are so passionate about sustainability.

Reducing Your Carbon Footprint in 8 Different Ways

Climate change is an issue that is hanging like a sword above all of our heads. The planet is suffering due to the rising level of carbon pollution. We must try to reduce our carbon footprint to reduce some pressure on the environment. Let us look at 8 ways to do so. 


Reduce your Driving

Ditch your car and walk or ride a bike whenever possible. Carpool to work or school and choose public transport as much as you can. Simple steps like that help in cutting down CO2 emissions significantly by spreading them out over many riders.


Reduce Water Usage 

You can reduce your water consumption by washing your car less often, installing drip irrigation to ensure that the plants receive only the amount they need and using climate-appropriate plants at your home. You must make water-efficient choices when you purchase bathroom and kitchen fixtures such as shower heads, dishwashers, faucet heats, etc. I 

Reuse and Recycle

When you make any product from scratch, you have to use a lot of energy on extracting resources, manufacturing them, packaging and transporting them. You can help in reducing the carbon footprint by using recycled products and reusing goods such as plastic bottles and glass containers


Use Alternative Sources of Energy

You can reduce your consumption of fossil fuels by using alternative sources of energy. Use wind, hydro, solar and geothermal energy and try to advocate about the same.


Light Up Differently 

Switch your light bulbs at home with light emitting diodes (LED). One LED helps in reducing up to 2000 pounds of carbon dioxide pollution during its lifetime. Therefore, by switching every light bulb with them you can drastically reduce the amount of electricity required to light up your house. Imagine what would happen if every house in the country did that!

Read the News Thoughtfully

There has been an ongoing debate of whether consuming news digitally is actually better than its print cousin. It has been said that reading the news digitally helps in saving trees as you no longer have to cut them to make paper, however, at the same time it has been argued that even surfing the web expends various amounts of energy depending on the device being used. The best way to go about it is to be mindful of how you choose to get your news. If you prefer print, recycle your papers instead of throwing them out. If you like the digital medium, opt for an unplugged laptop instead of a plugged-in device for the majority of your browsing time.

Telecommute and Teleconference 

Telecommuting is the practice of doing work remotely using the internet instead of fighting against the traffic to do the same work in an office. More and more companies are encouraging their employees to telecommute as it is quite effective. Long gone are the days when companies would send their employees to long distances via flights just to attend one meeting. It’s a waste of time and burdens the environment with huge amounts of CO2. Cut down a few trips and teleconference instead. You can’t completely reduce your CO2 footprint through these practices, but as they say — something is better than nothing.  


Plant a tree

Sounds obvious, but it is still one of the most efficient ways to slashing your carbon footprint. Trees not only provide shade and oxygen but also consume carbon dioxide. According to Urban Forestry Network, a single young tree is responsible for absorbing 13 pounds of carbon dioxide every year. As the tree grows, this amount adds up to 48 pounds. A 10 year old tree releases enough oxygen to support two human beings. So, go ahead and plant more trees!

By making smart and informed decisions such like recycling waste will go a long way in making the planet a little greener. 

Author Bio 
Erich Lawson is passionate about saving environment by effective recycling. He has written a wide array of articles on how modern recycling equipments can be used by industries to reduce monthly garbage bills and increase recycling revenue. You can learn more about environment savings techniques by visiting Northern California Compactors, Inc blog

3 Ways to Make Your Home a Little Greener

greenlivingguy.com3 Ways to Make Your Home a Little Greener

Climate change and going green are two of the hottest topics on everyone’s mind. Going green can mean quite a few things for different people. It can begin with transportation, diet, or changing the cleaning supplies you use. Today we want to discuss how we can make you’re a bit greener and change your impact on the planet.

Look to Your Roof

Green roofs are very popular amongst city dwellers. Land can be harder to come by, making growing a garden that much more difficult. And we need to have as much green space as possible to help create more oxygen, reduce urban heat issues, and provide affordable sustainable food sources for families in our communities. It’s important to pay attention to the weight of your green roof. Some soils, not to mention watering them, can create very heavy gardens on the roof. You also want to be aware of creating drainages to allow for safe run off. 


You also should decide if you wish to create a food garden or grass garden. Certain types of plants will be heavier than others and there are tons of different kinds of grass seed types available on the market. With so many options, we are confident you can find a green roof to fit your lifestyle!

Shorter Showers

This is one tip that bears repeating over and over, even though it’s one of the most popular tips out there. Baths take a lot of water and showers are a little more efficient in terms of water usage. But, you should still take the time to get in and out as fast as possible. An average shower runs around 8 minutes long, which is quite wasteful. Here are a few tips on how to cut down on shower time:

· Don’t turn on the shower until you are ready to get in

· Use a non toxic soap, shampoo and conditioner. So many toxins in typical brands

Meyer’s is a non toxic soap

· Save any shaving for the bathroom sink

· Wash and get out, no standing around under the water

· Swap out your shower head for a more efficient model

Change Your Lighting

Lighting is easily an area to go green in. Changing your lighting will reduce your electric bill and your impact on the planet. Additionally, changing out the materials can lessen the use of toxic materials to create them. Here are a few ways you can change the lighting in your home to reflect a greener lifestyle:

· Change your light bulbs to Light Emitting Diodes (LED) 

· Purchase lamps that are made from wood or recycled materials

· Unplug your power adaptors when your lighting fixture is not in use

· Install skylights designed to filter in sunlight to light your home

· Install dimmers to minimize electric usage for lighting

Lighting is easily an area to go green in. Changing your lighting will reduce your electric bill and your impact on the planet. Additionally, changing out the materials can lessen the use of toxic materials to create them. Here are a few ways you can change the lighting in your home to reflect a greener lifestyle:

Going green can sound like a daunting task, but really, it’s one of the more simplest moves we can make. And given our ecological state, it’s one thing we should do. Even if you only go green in one area of your life, it still makes all the difference. Do what you can, when you can!

Stop Littering Now Please! Stoplittering.com explains why and how!

Here is the thing. I do recycle religiously. My family knows this. Yet I’m not the main advocate here. It’s stoplittering.com

His website is selling the rights to a litter-free society. 

To symbolize and implement this enterprise we are selling stuff with our logo. By purchasing these items you will become authorized* to exercise your prerogative to pick up one or more pieces of litter a day. And, by actually engaging this prerogative, you are, in effect, voting for a clean society and helping to stigmatize littering. And you won’t feel like you’re the weird one for picking up litter at the bus stop since you won’t be the only one doing it.*products not actually required to exercise said authority.

What got me intetested was their campaign about 

JUST SAY NO TO STRAWS! 

FYI, their Green Living Guy support was the awesome bamboo shirt they sent.  Get ready to check out on my Instagram @greenlivingguy soon enough!!

Besides that I received no other compensation for this post folks. 


http://thelastplasticstraw.org/

Is an important resource and their strength, product lines and involvement in this issue is extremely important. 

As I wrote about in 2016 regarding plastic waste:

From drones to filters to artificial islands, innovators are working to reduce the threat thousands of tons of trash pose to marine ecosystems.

Located on the southern tip of the Pacific island chain of Hawaii, Kamilo Beach is an isolated stretch of black volcanic shoreline in the middle of nowhere. Just a few hundred yards from shore, humpback whales rise up from the depths, colorful fish fill the reefs and rare sea turtles swim in to nest on the beach.


Photo courtesy of Honolulu Civil Beat

But even in this remote place, garbage washes ashore each day. “We find a lot of toothbrushes and combs, plastic bottles and caps, over and over again,” says Megan Lamson, a marine biologist working for a local non-governmental organization, the Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund. (Source: Anja Krieger @anjakrieger)

In response to the growing anti-plastic movement, the paper drinking straw made a comeback in 2007 to meet the needs of zoos, aquariums and theme parks where plastic straws could kill animals if ingested. These new paper straws were crafted with the highest quality in mind, becoming much more durable than the first generation of paper straws. The earth conscious product soon took off among both restaurants and consumers, and is growing increasingly popular because of worldwide green initiatives.

Americans use approximately 500 million plastic straws per day, making them one of the top 10 debris items that pollute our oceans, beaches and marine life. Paper straws, which are biodegradable and decomposable, offer an earth friendly alternative to the harmful plastic straw. However, trusting that your paper straw won’t get soggy, deteriorate or bleed ink into your drink is another concern that most don’t consider.

Some plastic gets trucked to landfills, some to illegal dumping grounds and left to scatter, more is just recklessly discarded joining tons of the toxic stuff already cluttering our waterways. The latest research unmistakably proves that plastic waste toxins are being fed right back to us. It’s time to start producing less plastic trash – for our own health’s sake.


So as Stoplittering.com quotes:

“If I criticize somebody, it’s because I have higher hopes for the world, something good to replace the bad. I’m not saying what the Beat Generation says: ‘Go away because I’m not involved.’ I’m here, and I’m involved.” ~Mort Sahl