Small Start-Up Electronics Recycling Program Sprouts

With winter making the USA an ice cube and being inside most of the time, you can still clean up your old stuff. Here are tip/tricks and including a tip from New York based Guzu.com, an electronics recycling program which was launched by a trio of NYC eco-preneurs.

Guzu.com is reminding us that kitchens and closets are NOT the only things that need cleaning; gadgets need cleaning and recycling too! Guzu’s unique value proposition allows you to sell your used electronics for cash, which encourages everyone to e-cycle properly as well as to find hidden value in their abandoned gadgets. Through Guzu’s partnership with American Forests, they also plant a tree for every order completed.

Valuable De-Cluttering Tip by Guzu.com:
Uncover hidden value in your old electronics by recycling them properly this spring cleaning season
· Instead of throwing away your old iPod or Blackberry, consider recycling it with Guzu. Guzu.com pays consumers cash for their old working or non-working electronics and then recycles them to the highest extent possible. For example, Guzu offers $200 for used/working iPhone 4 and offer $80 for a broken one.
· Guzu offers a very simple, FREE, 3-step process for their customers to recycle their gadgets through www.guzu.com
· Don’t forget to check these hidden gadget goldmines to go green, get green and plant green!
o Office Desk Drawers (old blackberry)
o Car’s glove box (old iPod)
o Junk drawers (old Texas instrument calculator)
o Children’s playroom (gaming units)
o Garage/Shed; Attic; Basement

E-Cycling by the #s & Quick Guzu Facts:
· Regardless of whether your order has value or not, Guzu will still recycle it, plant a tree and cover the shipping of the electronic – no matter how clunky it is.
· Guzu’s Business & Volume Recycling division offers a turnkey, free recycling solution for small-to-medium-sized companies looking to recycle their old IT equipment and reduce their e-waste.
· Presently, there are over 3 billion consumer electronics in homes all across America and most likely, the non-working cell phones, gaming units, laptops and other out-dated electronics are lurking deep in the back of your junk drawer or hogging up space in your basement. These abandoned electronics go untouched and often are not recycled properly and end up in landfills – adding to the already 3 million tons of e-waste getting dumped each year.

Launched by a trio of eco-preneurs, Guzu has grown from a local New York recycling pick-up service to a nationwide electronics recycling company. Their programs encourage consumers to recycle their electronics properly by offering innovating value propositions. Guzu allows consumers and businesses to sell their working and non-working electronics for cash, discouraging dumping abandoned electronics in landfills and adding to the millions of pounds of e-waste produced every year. In its first month, Guzu recycled 3,400 pounds of e-waste and since then has been recycling an average of 3,500 extra pounds per month. To date, the young start-up has recycled 200,000 pounds of e-waste and has helped businesses and schools across the country – from New York City to Sleepy Eye, Minnesota – reduce their carbon footprint.

With the recent launch of Guzu.com, the online headquarters of the company’s national electronics recycling program, Guzu has made it as easy as ever for gadgets lovers to recycle responsibly as well as find hidden value in their discarded items. The inventive program, created by former online gaming entrepreneur and Guzu co-founder Hesam Meshkat, offers top dollar for valuable gadgets – including Blackberrys, iPads and video gaming consoles – which consumers have abandoned after upgrading to newer versions. With every unit recycled, Guzu plants a tree on behalf of the consumer through American Forrest, a nonprofit organization that seeks to protect the natural capital of trees and forests. Unlike resale websites, Guzu guarantees that every electronic unit obtained is recycled to the highest extent; the silicon on the boards, LCD’s, plastics, metals, and even the cardboard boxes customers use to mail their electronics to the company, are properly recycled, found a new home or use for, or sold for parts used to revive secondhand products for further use.

Guzu also hosts electronic recycling drives in cities across the country where residents are encouraged to donate their outdated electronics at participating locations. In addition, Guzu’s Business & Volume Recycling division offers a turnkey, free recycling solution for small-to-medium-sized companies looking to recycle their old IT equipment and reduce their e-waste.

Guzu’s innovative value proposition comes at a time of unprecedented growth for the Consumer Electronics Industry, forecasted by MarketResearch.com to reach over $289 billion by 2014. “The consumer electronics industry is one of the fastest growing in the U.S., offering an endless parade of new gadgets at the expense of older ones,” said Guzu co-founder and CEO Hesam Meshkat. “What consumers consider trash, the industry considers treasure –old electronics can be recycled for parts and materials used to feed the production process and secondhand market.”

There are presently over 3 billion consumer electronics in homes all across America and over 500 million consumer electronics sold annually. Many of these electronics are thrown away or stashed in junk drawers, with only a very small portion being sold on resale sites like eBay and Craigslist. Meshkat recognized the need for an incentive based national electronics recycling program that requires little work on the part of the consumer.

How To Recycle With Guzu: Consumers can recycle their gadgets on Guzu.com in three simple steps. First, users can search for their electronic item on the homepage and receive an immediate price quote from the company. Once their transaction is completed through the site, Guzu will email a FREE shipping label for the consumer to use in mailing their electronics to the company. Once the shipment is received and processed by Guzu, payment is sent via PayPal or business check, as designated by the consumer, and a tree is planted on their behalf.

Source: Guzu

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