Geothermal company Dandelion Energy partnering with Hudson Solar to bring 100% Renewable Energy to Hudson Valley and Capitol Region of NY

Today, my new partners at Dandelion, which is a geothermal startup that recently graduated X, the research and development lab at Google’s parent company, announces a partnership with Hudson Solar, the leading residential solarinstaller in the Hudson Valley and Capital Region.  Yes I’m teamed up with a Google Startup ok breathe breathe!).  

Plus, I know Hudson Solar. They were chosen as a leading provider of solar in the Solarize campaigns throughout most of the Hudson Valley. 

Together, these companies will offer homeowners the opportunity to easily get their homes to go 100% GREEN ENERGY. 
Dandelion as reported in the Poughkeepsie Journal today uses a new geothermal installation process developed at X, can convert homeowners away from oil or gas heat and offer them substantial savings.  

Hudson Solar, with its on-site or community solar offerings, can then offer homeowners to lower the cost of solar power.  A homeowner with geothermal, solar and energy efficiency can easily go 100 percent renewable. The Dandelion geothermal system will use solar electricity and the ground, as a source of heat and heatsink, to provide a home with heating, cooling and hot water! (BOOM!!)
Hudson Solar, with its on-site or community solar offerings, can then offer homeowners to lower the cost of solar power.  A homeowner with geothermal, solar and energy efficiency can easily go 100 percent renewable. The Dandelion geothermal system will use solar electricity and the ground, as a source of heat and heatsink, to provide a home with heating, cooling and hot water! (BOOM!!) 

Let’s put it this way, average geothermal installs cost around $40,000. Dandelion is about $20,000 and will offer financing and monthly payment plans. 

Now while solar costs about the same, the finance costs will be really more affordable than the grid.

Geothermal company Dandelion Energy partnering with Hudson Solar to bring 100% Renewable Energy to Hudson Valley and Capitol Region of NYDandelion Energy partners with Hudson Solar to bring 100% Renewable Energy to Hudson Valley and Capitol District in NY

“We chose Hudson Solar as our first solar partner because the company is well known for their high-quality work and share our values and excitement about the impact that our combined product will have on combating climate change,” Dandelion CEO Kathy Hannun said. “Hudson Solar’s unique offering of both on-site and community solar systems means they can provide all of Dandelion’s customers a way to power their geothermal systems with clean electricity. ”

“Dandelion has lowered the cost of geothermal and set up financing so a homeowner switching to geothermal from oil or propane can save money from day one, just like with solar,” Hudson Solar CEO Jeff Irish said. ” … And with our community solar arrays, even people who can’t site solar on their property can go solar.”

Source: Dandelion Energy

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18 plants to make your garden friendly for Bees

One of the signs of your garden being happy and healthy is the sight of some bees buzzing around…

But sadly. modern farming methods are reducing the population of bees around the world. So we thought it was time to give nature a helping hand!

This infographic runs through a range of methods (no matter where you are in the world) to make your garden bee-friendly: https://www.budgetdirect.com.au/blog/18-plants-grow-bee-friendly-garden.html

Paper Is One of The Most Recycled Products in The World

We do use a lot of paper but at least we seem to be moving in the right direction as regards recycling it. In the last 20 years or so, the recovery rate for paper has almost doubled. This is great to see but of course there is still room for improvement. This infographic from Colourfast takes you through the progress we are making but also offers advice on how we can further improve.

Saving paper saves more than trees with one ton of recycled paper incredibly saving 60,000 gallons of water. There are some misconceptions about what can and can’t be recycled. For example, some people believe that you need to remove staples, paper clips etc. before you recycle but remember that modern recycling procedures are generally designed to do this for you. Find out more in the infographic.

Top 7 Tips for Eco-Friendly Travellers

With concern for the environment growing on a daily basis, many travellers are thinking twice before they plan their next big adventure. Most of the time, travel is wasteful. Pollutants are released into the air, fossil fuels are burned, and garbage is left behind. Things don’t have to be that way if you change the way you travel. With eco-friendly travel on the rise, it’s easier than ever.

1. Be Careful About Generating Trash

You can use the same reusable containers you use at home. Just bring them with you. Most establishments will happily serve you food and drinks in the containers you’ve provided. You can wash them and reuse them for your entire trip, minimizing or eliminating the need for single use disposable products.

2. Choose Your Accomodations Wisely  Staying at a hotel makes it hard to prepare your own meals and recycle what you need to recycle. Looking into flat shares is a great option – especially if the person you’re staying with already lives in an environmentally responsible way. You’ll have a kitchen you can use to prepare food you’ve purchased rather than having to eat out all the time, and you can take full advantage of the environmental sustainability of the home you’re staying in.

2. Choose Your Accomodations Wisely

Staying at a hotel makes it hard to prepare your own meals and recycle what you need to recycle. Looking into flat shares is a great option – especially if the person you’re staying with already lives in an environmentally responsible way. You’ll have a kitchen you can use to prepare food you’ve purchased rather than having to eat out all the time, and you can take full advantage of the environmental sustainability of the home you’re staying in.

3. Opt Into Nature and Out of Tourist Traps

Tourist traps use up a lot of electricity and generate a lot of waste. The best way to view this situation is by thinking about what really matters the most. An attraction designed for a tourist doesn’t necessarily embody the spirit of your destination. What about the nature, or the wildlife reserves? You can enjoy a place even more when you venture to its roots.

4. Investigate Your Transportation Options

Cities that see a lot of tourism often offer high efficiency electric scooters or bicycles that can be rented for local travel. If you need to go a longer distance, stick to the public transportation. Not only will you save the money you would have spent on a rental, but you also won’t be adding to the emissions while you’re away.

5. Stay Local

One of the best things about exploring a new place is enjoying the things they produce locally. Craft beers, boutique wines, locally grown coffee, and farmer’s market food gives you a chance to try something new and exciting. Don’t rely on imports when you don’t have to – they put more strain on the environment, and you’ll really be missing out on the most delicious aspects of a new place.

6. Keep It Intimate

The more people on the trip, the more of an impact you’ll have. Don’t bring people who don’t really want to go. Giant group trips are really hard to plan and they’re very expensive. Limit your travel companions to the people in your closest circle. Take your sweetheart, your best friend, or even go it alone.

7. Give Back When You Take

We all share the same environment. While you’re away, volunteer to improve or protect the environment. You’ll learn a lot, meet the locals, and give back to the community you’re experiencing. If you can’t find an opportunity while you’re away, do some good for the environment back at home. We all live on one planet, and when good is done in any part of the world, it affects everyone positively.

You don’t have to let concerns about the environment prevent you from going out and enjoying your life. Just be smart in the way you travel, and do your best to respect the world no matter where you are.

Jessica Landor is an experienced blogger who likes to share her knowledge and write about anything that makes other’s lives better and easier. She likes to cover productivity, green living and self-improvement topics. Whenever not working, she’s on her yoga classes.

How 3D-Printed Solar Panels Will Impact Renewable Energy

The solar industry has experienced massive growth in the past few years as technological advancements have made solar panels more affordable and efficient.

Researchers at the University of Newcastle (UON) in Australia recently combined solar with another new technology, 3D printing, to make getting power from the sun even more accessible and effective.

How It Works
With 3D printing, you can create almost anything that you have a blueprint and a large enough machine for. And it doesn’t just print plastic replicas. You can create real, functional items. Anything from parts for machinery to human organs to houses could potentially be printed using the technology.

The team at UON, led by Professor Paul Dastoor, created an electronic, conductive ink as well as a process for printing that substance onto clear, thin, laminated sheets. The sheets are flexible yet durable enough that it can be rolled up for transportation.

The solar film is light enough that it can be attached to roofs and walls with Velcro. To install the sheet, you simply roll it out onto the surface you want to attach it to.

Potential Benefits
One of the major barriers to the adoption of solar energy has consistently been cost. While prices have dropped significantly in recent years due to improvements in technology and financial incentives from both government and utility companies — like a 30 percent credit on your tax return — the cost of installation can still be too high for some

3D printing could help lower that barrier to entry. With the new 3D-printed solar technology, production cost is around just $1 for each square foot. Professor Dastoor’s solar film is efficient too, which makes solar even more affordable.

UON installed the solar sheets on their campus in order to study their performance. So far, the findings have been promising. Researchers have found that the 3D-printed solar tech generated electricity more consistently than standard panels even with cloud cover and in low-light situations. The film has even been able to produce small amounts of power from moonlight.

The fact that the solar film is lightweight and flexible means it can be transported more easily than non-pliable solar panels. It can be rolled up, allowing large amounts of the stuff to be shipped in small spaces.

It can also be printed relatively quickly from any properly equipped 3D printer. This, as well as the ease with which it can be transported, means it could potentially have applications in disaster relief situations and be used to provide power to remote communities.

The technology could also, of course, benefit the environment by making it easier and more feasible for people to get their energy from the sun, which does not directly create carbon emissions and utilizes a renewable resource as opposed to a finite and harmful one.

What’s Next?
The technology has already piqued the interest of a commercial partner – CHEP, a global logistics company. CHEP and UON are planning to install the material at one of its facilities during the next financial year. Professor Dastoor also recently demonstrated his project at Pacprint, a printing convention in Melbourne, Australia.


It’s easy to see why the technology has attracted interest. It’s affordable, easily transportable and efficient as well as futuristic-sounding. It could also possibly revolutionize the energy industry in even more groundbreaking ways.

For large-scale rollouts of 3D-printed solar sheets, you’d need industrial-sized 3D printers. For smaller, residential projects, however, a relatively small personal 3D printer may do. This would take the power out of the hands of large utility companies and give it to the consumer. Solar panels already do this to an extent by allowing residential customers to generate their own power. If people could create and install their own solar panels, it would take this even further.

If people can print their own solar material, they could also customize those products to their own needs. Solar panels could be engineered to be installed in more obscure places than the rooftops of homes and potentially provide power to remote facilities. Provided that solar technology continues to improve or that these isolated facilities wouldn’t need large amounts of power, people may even be able to avoid connecting to the grid entirely.

While these ideas are the result of some speculation, this new 3D-printed solar technology does create the potential for them to actually work. Dastoor’s project takes advantage of technologies from two industries that are likely to grow significantly and change the world in noteworthy ways in the near future. The result of combining solar and 3D printing certainly has the potential to make some substantial changes in our world.