Arçelik to reduce energy use in production by 45% in line with its “2020 Sustainability Goals”

ReportAlert 

Leading global home appliances company Arçelik A.Ş. has published its 9th sustainability report disclosing 2020 sustainability goals.  

Company comes forward with an exceptional track record and ambitious sustainability roadmap:  Having halved the production-related greenhouse gas emissions since 2010, Arçelik focuses to reduce its emissions relentlessly and signed the Science Based Targets Initiative. Leading global home appliances company Arçelik A.Ş. has published its 9th sustainability report disclosing 2020 sustainability goals.

Hakan Bulgurlu, CEO of Arçelik A.Ş. stated: “For the future of our world, we build our business plans on sustainable models. For the first time with this report, we share our goals for 2020, which are aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. We aim to reduce our energy use in production by 45% per product and to obtain the energy we use in our factories in Turkey solely from renewables by 2020.”

Company comes forward with an exceptional track record and ambitious sustainability roadmap:

Having halved the production-related greenhouse gas emissions since 2010, Arçelik focuses to reduce its emissions relentlessly and signed the Science Based Targets Initiative. 

Company reduced its energy used in production by 34% per product compared to 2010 and the goal is 45%,

achieved water savings of 31% in production per product base year 2012, and plans to increase to 35%,

increased the share of electricity obtained from renewable energy sources in its Turkey plants from 88% up to 100%,  

plans to have the 6 MWp of renewable energy capacity,  

aims to increase the percentage of the female managers from 16% up to 24%,

having adopted responsible production and consumption approach, aims to raise awareness for food waste.

plans to create a “Supplier Sustainability Index”.

To read the report 

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How to Select a Green Lodge when Traveling, Part 2

How about ecotourism associations? Don’t they have member directories that anyone can see? Of course they do, though not all are open to views from non-members. But this is one way to do your search.

For example the United Nations World Travel Organization (UNWTO) has an affiliate directory, you can narrow your search by country.

http://affiliatemembers.unwto.org/affiliate-members-directory

Some government agencies (through their tourism bureaus) and NGOs also list places that they have certified based on their training and credentialing programs. Two examples would be:

The Rainforest Alliance – http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/faqs/what-does-rainforest-alliance-certified-mean

The EU EcoLabel – http://ec.europa.eu/ecat/hotels-campsites/en

In the UK there are many opportunities for “green” and “organic” vacations.In the UK there are many opportunities for “green” and “organic” vacations. Click here to learn more about a useful directory created by a local writer from Yorkshire -  https://www.ecotourlinq.com/blog/spotlight-interview-with-organic-holidays-uk

In the UK there are many opportunities for “green” and “organic” vacations. Click here to learn more about a useful directory created by a local writer from Yorkshire –

https://www.ecotourlinq.com/blog/spotlight-interview-with-organic-holidays-uk

Here are some national ecotourism organizations with listings of green facilities in their own countries:

For the UK http://www.green-tourism.com/go-green/

For Portugal http://greenstays.pt/shop/?lang=en

For Australia (by state) – https://www.ecotourism.org.au/eco-experiences/green-travel-guide/?sStates=QLD&sCertificationDetailPages=&sExperienceTypes=15&sSearchKey=#mapContents

For Kenya – http://www.ecotourismkenya.org/facility.php

Coming up in Part 3 – What to Look for in a Green Lodge

Guest Writer Bio: Deborah Regen is the publisher of a website directory and blog dedicated to consumer information about ecotourism and sustainable travel. She also sends out a free monthly e-newsletter to subscribers including notices of giveaways. Site URL = https://www.EcoTourLinQ.com and her email = admin@ecotourlinq.com

Tips for Recycling Your Construction Waste

In a healthy economy, construction waste makes up one-third of all refuse. At this scale, even small efforts towards recycling and reusing leftover building material or debris make a big change. Construction waste consists mostly of concrete, wood, drywall, shingles, asphalt and metal, but also cardboard and plastic from packaging. Although considered waste, many of these materials are valuable commodities that can be recycled to make new products or used in many ways. In short, recycling benefits both a construction business and the environment.
 Description	 English: A bag of cut polyurethane blocks that have been cut up and can no longer be used. As can be clearly seen, this kind of insulator is wasteful, and as such, extra expensive. A more suitable alternative could be compressed straw as insulator, or other alternatives. Date	17 June 2008 Source	 Own work Author	 KVDP
Planning before building

As a large part of building waste can be recycled or reused, its removal needs preparation from the very beginning. Along with other construction plans, make one for waste collection, disposal and recycling. Mark a place on the site where workers can dispose of debris and material leftovers. This site mustn’t obstruct the work, nor cause any safety hazards for workers.

Discarded materials and their uses

Each discarded material has its recyclable potential. Bricks, for example, can be reused or crushed to make road bases. Undamaged windows and doors can be refitted to other homes, as well as plumbing fixtures, like tubs. Lumber and wood products can be reused for further construction or converted to mulch or biomass fuel. Metals can be smelted and converted into other products. Vegetation and trees can be replanted if possible or used for biomass fuel.

Building it back

Probably the best and the safest method is to integrate construction waste into a new building or another building site, where applicable. For example, if you are remodelling, you don’t have to demolish the walls, but rather reconfigure or move them. Lumber leftovers from wood-framed structures can be used for fire blocking or as spacers. In addition, use building materials supplied in standard measurements whenever possible. The less you have to cut or remove, the less waste you will create. What is more, standard dimensions let you reuse any leftover materials more easily.  

Deconstruction instead demolition

Some laws propose or encourage removing reusable items without damage so they can be reused in housing projects. A contractor who is paying for the removal can even be granted certain tax benefits. If no such project exists, the contractor can organize a front yard sale of items like radiators, grates, piping, fixtures and fittings that are in acceptable condition.

Sorting the waste

In order to process them easier later on, different types of construction waste need to be deposited in separate piles. Concrete, asphalt, bricks and shingles can go together. Window frames and doors can go on the pile for wood and timber leftovers. Plastic, cables and nylons will go in the third, and so on. Separating and sorting materials from the very beginning makes them easier to remove and also lowers the disposal costs.

Local is always cheaper

You can avoid costly transport expenses by browsing local businesses that specialize in construction waste removal. Inquire what each of them offers and select the one that has an efficient recycling programme. To save time and money, ask them to provide containers on the site so you can dispose of materials on the go. Alternatively, you can dispose of waste every time you go out to fetch new building materials. Selecting a reputable waste recycling centre can save you a lot of headaches.  

Safety measures

When sorting and separating items in containers, make sure no unwanted materials get inside. If any amount of rubbish is placed with the sorted waste, the entire load is considered unacceptable for recycling. Make sure the bins and containers have clear labels for different types of waste.

There are many ways to reuse construction waste, so make sure it doesn’t simply end on the landfill. By recycling materials or integrating them into further construction, you won’t only reduce the amount of waste produced by the site, but also make savings through different municipal projects or by selling reusable items.

2017 Best Options for Beautiful and Eco-Friendly Window Upgrades

Kaitlin Krull

Looking after your windows is a vital part of keeping your home safe and comfortable. Quality windows are also more environmentally friendly now than ever before, so occasional upgrades and repairs are essential if you want to reduce your energy bills and insulate your home. At Modernize, we help homeowners make their homes greener in simple and straightforward ways, so here are a few options to help you choose beautiful and eco-friendly window upgrades for your home. 

Looking after your windows is a vital part of keeping your home safe and comfortable. Quality windows are also more environmentally friendly now than ever before, so occasional upgrades and repairs are essential if you want to reduce your energy bills and insulate your home. At Modernize, we help homeowners make their homes greener in simple and straightforward ways, so here are a few options to help you choose beautiful and eco-friendly window upgrades for your home.

Period windows

Windows are one of the most prominent and recognizable features of older and period homes. However, homeowners often struggle to keep their period windows maintained to a modern standard of insulation and efficiency. If the original windows in your older home need some TLC, then don’t despair: specialist window professionals can tastefully upgrade your original windows and make them fit for contemporary living. Adding double glazing, shutters, awnings, and blinds to period windows will make them perform better throughout the year and increase your home’s green status while maintaining the charm and design style of your home.

Sustainable frames

Sustainable building is on trend in the construction world today and involves the use of low-tech craftsmanship and thoughtfully sourced materials to create a low-carbon product that is both beautiful and eco-friendly. If you want to incorporate these practices the next time you upgrade your windows, choose window specialists who create bespoke frames made from FSC certified sustainable wood or locally sourced aluminum and other materials. Shopping local also decreases the carbon footprint of your windows, since the shipping distance is negligible and less energy is consumed, while constructing frames by hand consumes less energy during the building process.

Skylights  If you want to further decrease your home’s energy bills and have already installed energy efficient windows throughout your home, it might be time to consider natural light as a supplement to your in-home lighting systems. Skylight windows are an often overlooked window alternative that will save you money on your electricity bills by maximizing the natural light in your home. Placing skylights strategically throughout your living spaces will make the most of exterior light and make your home more eco-friendly throughout the year—just be sure to choose skylights with double or even triple paned glass for added energy efficiency.  Unique windows  While traditional windows certainly have a place in your home, there are times when homeowners need or want to get creative with their windows for both aesthetic and environmental reasons. Floor to ceiling windows made from energy efficient glass (two or three panes with an insulating gas between layers and low-e coatings to increase insulation inside and reflect sunlight outside) create a stunning, bright effect in your home by bringing the outside in. Irregular shaped windows such as circles, semicircles, and long rectangles will add instant charm to your home, while restored or repurposed stained or

Skylights

If you want to further decrease your home’s energy bills and have already installed energy efficient windows throughout your home, it might be time to consider natural light as a supplement to your in-home lighting systems. Skylight windows are an often overlooked window alternative that will save you money on your electricity bills by maximizing the natural light in your home. Placing skylights strategically throughout your living spaces will make the most of exterior light and make your home more eco-friendly throughout the year—just be sure to choose skylights with double or even triple paned glass for added energy efficiency.

Unique windows  While traditional windows certainly have a place in your home, there are times when homeowners need or want to get creative with their windows for both aesthetic and environmental reasons. Floor to ceiling windows made from energy efficient glass (two or three panes with an insulating gas between layers and low-e coatings to increase insulation inside and reflect sunlight outside) create a stunning, bright effect in your home by bringing the outside in. Irregular shaped windows such as circles, semicircles, and long rectangles will add instant charm to your home, while restored or repurposed stained or

Unique windows

While traditional windows certainly have a place in your home, there are times when homeowners need or want to get creative with their windows for both aesthetic and environmental reasons. Floor to ceiling windows made from energy efficient glass (two or three panes with an insulating gas between layers and low-e coatings to increase insulation inside and reflect sunlight outside) create a stunning, bright effect in your home by bringing the outside in. Irregular shaped windows such as circles, semicircles, and long rectangles will add instant charm to your home, while restored or repurposed stained or textured glass gives your home a vintage look that is both eco-friendly and beautiful. Finally, functional windows such as glass blocks and egress windows give your home added security and privacy and can be made to your exacting standards of energy efficiency. To lear more about different window types check out Modernize Windows.

Renewables on the grid: Putting the negative-price myth to bed

Three years ago, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) rebutted arguments that occurrences of negative prices at nuclear plants in Illinois were frequently caused by wind energy. That “compelling” data led FERC Commissioner John Norris, who had previously discussed his concerns about negative prices, to affirm that “the focus on negative prices is a distraction.”
More recently, we have documented that many instances of negative prices are caused by conventional power plants.

AWEA has now made our prior analysis far more comprehensive by examining full-year 2016 price data for all retiring power plants in the main wholesale electricity markets that have a large amount of wind generation: PJM, MISO, SPP, and ERCOT.

AWEA has now made our prior analysis far more comprehensive by examining full-year 2016 price data for all retiring power plants in the main wholesale electricity markets that have a large amount of wind generation: PJM, MISO, SPP, and ERCOT.
The results, which we are releasing today for the first time, confirm that any instances of renewable policies like the Production Tax Credit (PTC) and state renewable standard credits being factored into market prices have a trivial impact on retiring power plants.

Across more than 1.8 million data points, which cover all 2016 pricing intervals in the day-ahead electricity market for all retiring power plants in those regions, only 55 instances of negative prices were found that could have been set by a wind project receiving the PTC. The analysis includes market price data for all power plants that have retired since 2012 or have announced plans to retire.

Our analysis focused on the day-ahead electricity market (the results bolded below), as that is where nuclear and coal generators sell most if not all of their generation. However, the results show that wind plants almost never set prices for an additional 2.4 million data points in the real-time electricity market as well. For more background on electricity markets and how prices are set, see the last section of this post.

In PJM and MISO, which account for a large share of all power plants in wholesale markets that are retiring nationwide, only 0.003 percent of day-ahead market prices at retiring power plants were in a range that could be set by a wind project receiving the PTC, as shown on the left side of the table. Occurrences of negative prices that could be wind-related were even less frequent in SPP, at 0.0017 percent of day-ahead market price intervals. Those occurrences were slightly more common at retiring plants in ERCOT, at 0.06 percent of price intervals, but it should be noted that there is only one retiring coal power plant in ERCOT.

To underscore the trivial impact of the PTC in setting market prices, the right side of the table shows how prices would change if wind projects receiving the PTC no longer received the credit. In PJM and MISO, conservatively assuming that all negative prices in that range were set by wind projects receiving the PTC, Day-Ahead Market prices at retiring power plants would increase by an average of $0.0007, or 1/13th of a penny per megawatt hour (MWh), if operating wind projects no longer received the PTC. Retiring power plants in SPP saw an even smaller impact at 1/25th of a penny, while the one retiring coal power plant in ERCOT saw an impact of around one penny per MWh.

It is important to clarify that the PTC does directly reduce consumer electricity costs outside of the electricity market. The PTC and other incentives allow wind projects to offer lower long-term contract prices to customers and the utilities who serve them, which translates into lower electric bills for consumers on a 1:1 basis.

However, those contract payments are outside of the wholesale electricity market, so they are not directly factored into the wholesale electricity market prices received by other generators.

The facts about energy incentives

In reality, the wind PTC has been a remarkable success in driving the American innovation and efficiency that have driven a two-third reduction in the cost of wind energy since 2009. The more than 102,500 Americans working in the wind industry today are creating a new industry with a bright future, bringing tens of billions of dollars in investment to rural areas and tens of thousands of manufacturing jobs to America. Production-based incentives like the PTC have driven efficiency increases that make U.S. wind projects some of the most productive in the world.

In reality, the wind PTC has been a remarkable success in driving the American innovation and efficiency that have driven a two-third reduction in the cost of wind energy since 2009. The more than 102,500 Americans working in the wind industry today are creating a new industry with a bright future, bringing tens of billions of dollars in investment to rural areas and tens of thousands of manufacturing jobs to America. Production-based incentives like the PTC have driven efficiency increases that make U.S. wind projects some of the most productive in the world.    Regardless, Congress voted in December 2015 to phase down the wind PTC, and we are now in year three of that five-year phasedown period. Despite the recent focus on incentives for renewables, cumulatively wind energy has received only 3 percent of federal energy incentives, versus 86 percent for fossil and nuclear sources, according to the Nuclear Energy Institute and other experts. Given that the wind industry’s “tax reform” is already in place with the PTC phasedown legislation, we would welcome a comprehensive look at all forms of subsidies for all electricity sources.  Market dynamics are driving retirements  Market dynamics are benefiting consumers by driving retirement of older, less efficient resources in favor of more efficient resources. A wide range of experts agree that the primary factors driving power plant retirements and economic challenges for generators of all types are cheap natural gas and flat electricity demand.  The following map, compiled from Department of Energy data, shows that most retiring coal and nuclear plants are in regions that have little to no renewable generation, confirming that renewable energy or pro-renewable policies cannot be the primary factor driving those retirements.    Rather, the primary factor driving power plant retirements appears to be low-cost shale gas production undercutting relatively high-cost Appalachian and Illinois Basin coal in the Eastern U.S., as shown below. In the regions shaded red in the map, the fuel cost of producing electricity from natural gas is significantly
Regardless, Congress voted in December 2015 to phase down the wind PTC, and we are now in year three of that five-year phasedown period. Despite the recent focus on incentives for renewables, cumulatively wind energy has received only 3 percent of federal energy incentives, versus 86 percent for fossil and nuclear sources, according to the Nuclear Energy Institute and other experts. Given that the wind industry’s “tax reform” is already in place with the PTC phasedown legislation, we would welcome a comprehensive look at all forms of subsidies for all electricity sources.

Market dynamics are driving retirements

Market dynamics are benefiting consumers by driving retirement of older, less efficient resources in favor of more efficient resources. A wide range of experts agree that the primary factors driving power plant retirements and economic challenges for generators of all types are cheap natural gas and flat electricity demand.

The following map, compiled from Department of Energy data, shows that most retiring coal and nuclear plants are in regions that have little to no renewable generation, confirming that renewable energy or pro-renewable policies cannot be the primary factor driving those retirements.

Rather, the primary factor driving power plant retirements appears to be low-cost shale gas production undercutting relatively high-cost Appalachian and Illinois Basin coal in the Eastern U.S., as shown below. In the regions shaded red in the map, the fuel cost of producing electricity from natural gas is significantly lower than the fuel cost of coal power plants, explaining why utilities in those regions are moving from coal to natural gas generation.

For the entire story on the AWEA blog, MICHAEL GOGGIN, JULY 18, 2017